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  • Lunging at people..

    I've been trying really hard to stop my dane from lunging at strangers that walk by on the sidewalk. My dane literally just lunges at them and jumps on them!!

    Please help!
    sigpic

    Blue Dane - Samantha - 11 months old

    Black Dane - Jet - 2 1/2 months old

  • #2
    what type of training or attempts of stopping her have you used so far?
    sigpic
    Emily
    Jazz - GD rescued at 5 months (september 27th, 2009)
    Blues - GD rescued at ? grew through 2012 (July 29, 2011)
    Preston - 8 y/o "grumpy old man" yorkie mix

    bluesfightscancer.com

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    • #3
      1. Management.
      Put the dog in some sort of gear that gives you control over him. My preference is a body harness clipped at the front, will give you leverage against the pulling and jumping.
      Don’t walk the dog in close proximity to people if you can help it.

      2. Training. Enroll your dog in a basic manners class for sure.
      Train him not to pull on the leash ever for any reason. Train him to sit and approach people calmly. Train him that four on the floor is the most rewarding place to be around people. Do you allow him to jump on you at home?


      3. Socialization. Once you can control him with management and training, make sure to get him out and about and around lots of positive experiences with people of all shapes and sizes and other dogs too. Interactions should be positive and enjoyable.
      Until one has loved an animal, part of one's soul remains unawakened.
      - Anatole France

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      • #4
        We have recently developed this bad behavior as well because I think Mouse realizes she is stronger than us. We went through puppy class and she was a rock star with the loose leash walking. This behavior didn't start until after classes finished.

        Working with our trainer we have tried everything from having her sit and wait while the people walked by, but she was under 4 months and just didn't have the self control just yet. We also have the harness that clips in the front, but she is just too strong for me. We have also tried stepping on the leash so it's impossible for her to jump up, but we can't always catch this in time.

        What we have finally had to result to the head collar. This has been very effective for us. As she gets more comfortable with walking past people without trying to lung we will begin to ween her off the head collar and back onto walking on her own collar.

        We have the fortune of working with a good trainer that is helping us through this. If you can find a good trainer in your area that are more than willing to help.
        sigpicMouse Halloween 2013

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        • #5
          Originally posted by ouesi View Post
          1. Management.
          Put the dog in some sort of gear that gives you control over him. My preference is a body harness clipped at the front, will give you leverage against the pulling and jumping.
          Don’t walk the dog in close proximity to people if you can help it.

          2. Training. Enroll your dog in a basic manners class for sure.
          Train him not to pull on the leash ever for any reason. Train him to sit and approach people calmly. Train him that four on the floor is the most rewarding place to be around people. Do you allow him to jump on you at home?


          3. Socialization. Once you can control him with management and training, make sure to get him out and about and around lots of positive experiences with people of all shapes and sizes and other dogs too. Interactions should be positive and enjoyable.
          We're extremely strict at home. We don't let her get away with much. She knows shes not allowed to jump on counters and people.

          Shes completely different when other people are around. We currently use a pinch collar but it doesn't affect her at all. She never pulls unless she sees other people/dogs and will not care if we try to snap her out of it.

          She's currently 9 1/2 months old, maybe its a teenage phase?

          She socializes with other people and dogs all the time at the dog park and absolutely loves it
          sigpic

          Blue Dane - Samantha - 11 months old

          Black Dane - Jet - 2 1/2 months old

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          • #6
            Get. To. A. Behaviourist/trainer. STAT!
            You need to figure out what's going on and ways of ensuring she doesn't do this.
            Try carrying high value treats and when YOU see someone, you start treating her. Step, treat, step, treat, step, treat. Each good step, gets a treat. LOts of praise, head and neck scratches.
            Castiel used to bark, lunge and act a general fool around strangers. He's still not 100% around tall men, but usually does pretty good in a crowd, so long as we're able to keep moving. It'll take time and work, and you'll have to carry treats with you all the time to reward good behaviours.

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            • #7
              You've gotten good advise here. She is too over excited by the time she is being corrected, so that's why it's not working. You will need to keep her below this threshold for over excitement for any training method to work for you.

              Try to keep her below her threshold by noticing at what distance she tends to be at from these "triggers" i.e people, dogs when she goes off and then keep her below that distance. This may require some silly looking behavior like turning around and walking the opposite direction, or crossing the street, or even stepping into woods or parks.

              Try to take her to areas where you won't be set up for failure by having an environment with SO many triggers that you are not in control, meaning able to turn around and keep your distance without running into another trigger. Then, when she's just below threshold, meaning far enough away from the trigger not to go ballistic, and yet she notices it, get her attention, and give a high value reward. I mean, any attention, a head turn your way, mark the behavior with a "good girl/boy" or a click on a clicker and give a big reward. You do this enough and you will notice the distance to the trigger before she goes ballistic will start to shrink.

              I still can't walk Lucas in super high traffic areas, or pass a dog on the same side of the street right next to us, but he used to have a total dog fit every time he saw anything or anyone (dog, jogger, bike, skateboard, cat, kid, car, rabit-you name it) and our distance from the trigger continually shrinks before he's at threshold (threshold is now about 6 feet instead of 50 for some triggers, other triggers he's totally fine with now-like people in their front yards), he doesn't even notice stuff anymore because he's paying more attention to me, and usually when he sees stuff now he looks at me to see what he'll get. No more fits. Walking is a pleasure and I'm always impressed with him when I'm done.
              sigpic
              1 husband * 1 teenager * 2 great danes * 2 boxers * 1 cats * 2 African cichlids * 34 land hermit crabs
              RIP Tyler RIP Smokey
              http://thegratedanegane.wordpress.com/

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Cbecker View Post
                We're extremely strict at home. We don't let her get away with much. She knows shes not allowed to jump on counters and people.
                If she *knows* she’s not allowed to jump on people, she shouldn’t be doing it outside of the home either. Continue training the no jumping.

                Originally posted by Cbecker View Post
                Shes completely different when other people are around. We currently use a pinch collar but it doesn't affect her at all. She never pulls unless she sees other people/dogs and will not care if we try to snap her out of it.
                Snap her out of what? She wants to say hi and doesn’t know how to do it appropriately. Nothing to snap her out of, just teach her how to approach people politely. Once you’ve lost her brain, there is no training, just get her out of there, create distance. Training happens when the dog’s brain is engaged not when they’re over aroused past the point of no return.
                If the pinch collar doesn’t work, try something else. Some folks on here use a head collar, but I’d worry about neck damage with the behavior you describe. There are several harness threads that might be worth searching.

                Originally posted by Cbecker View Post
                She's currently 9 1/2 months old, maybe its a teenage phase?
                If you’re thinking teenage phase as in she’ll grow out of it, remember dogs tend to grow IN to behaviors not out of them. It could be teenager stuff, but it really doesn’t matter. Its 100% unacceptable to have a giant dog lunging at people so it needs to stop.

                Originally posted by Cbecker View Post
                She socializes with other people and dogs all the time at the dog park and absolutely loves it
                Get her in to a class. If the only time she socializes is in the mayhem and excitement that is most dog park settings, then she is going to associate people with excitement and go right in to overexcitement. If you get her in to a class she can learn that people can be ignored, viewed from afar, greeted calmly etc. Classes are a great way to socialize in a CONTROLLED setting that sets the dog up for success.
                Until one has loved an animal, part of one's soul remains unawakened.
                - Anatole France

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                • #9
                  I really agree that getting a trainer involved would be your best bet. People can give advice online, but they can't be TOTALLY sure of what the problem is, nor can you know if you are executing the techniques correctly. Especially since you have another puppy coming, it is really better to have your first dane trained before bringing in another, who can easily pick up bad habits. We have someone in our neighborhood with two and I just can't imagine trying to walk those guys together, and I never see them do it anymore since the puppy got bigger. It's so dangerous...

                  If you want to PM or email me (through meetup or whatever) I can happily refer you to some great local trainers if you are interested in getting help.
                  sigpic Halpert at 28 months

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                  • #10
                    Our Lily is 8 months old and every bit of 80lbs...and growing. I have sought, as many of you have also, tips and suggested methods for various training issues with some success and lots of frustrations from all the sources I can find. I write with extreme praise for what I found to be an immediate change in her lunging while walking. Oh and how she can lunge! I have tried several harnesses, leads, collars, chain type as well as slip collars (even the ¾ inch one) as well as the suggested methods for training. I have turned around I don't know how many times as she wondered ahead or lunged. I change direction, go slow, go faster. We go up hill, down hill and long straight shots too. I was hopeful that sooner or later she would respond. Well she did and it was with the Optifit Halti. Sure, she was puzzled and resistant when I first put it on her. I made slight fit adjustment before we went out. I'd say her resistance was mild and expected, but short lived. You will find this hard to believe, especially those of you who have had extreme lunging problems as I have...but I am not exaggerating one bit when I tell you that she never lunged even one time the entire walk. We were out for about half an hour that first time. I took her left, right, back, slow, fast, up and down the hill. She stayed right at my side. In fact, where before her head was always in front trying to lunge, now she almost seems to lag. Not really lag...just right at my side. I had a loose lead most of the way. When I pulled up to stop so she could sit for a treat, she had no trouble eating it at all. I will admit that from that sit position, there were a few times when she sort of tossed her head trying to shake free of the Halti. The fit is so good that my concern that she might break free was unfounded. I was so unsure of how this would play out that I also had a strap handle harness on her with a separate lead wrapped from it around my waist. I was taking no chances on her escaping. No problem. I have been struggling with lunging for so long and I can attest that if your Dane is a strong lunger...give the Halti Optifit a go. The adjustable chin strap is great and the nose protector does not interfere with her eyes. It is a very good product. I am now not afraid for my wife to take her out. Like a dummy, I should have known, having had horses before, that a halter is how you lead a huge horse with no trouble. DUHHHH! They go where the head goes. It is so simple.

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