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  • Crate training...is it a must?

    I crate trained my Great Dane (RIP Ryleigh) but now that I have two Dane pups I am wondering if everyone generally crate trains their pups.

    So is there anyone out there who doesn't use a crate and still has an intact sofa?

  • #2
    My danes are almost never crated, but my boxers are. With puppies I worry about the danger of what they could chew when I'm not around. It's dangerous IMO not to crate a puppy, unless they have their own puppy-proffed room. I crate my adult boxers for the same reason, but my danes don't get into anything.
    sigpic
    1 husband * 1 teenager * 2 great danes * 2 boxers * 1 cats * 2 African cichlids * 34 land hermit crabs
    RIP Tyler RIP Smokey
    http://thegratedanegane.wordpress.com/

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    • #3
      Boxers are notorious chewers. Had two growing up and they destroyed everything in their reach. Anywho pups should be crated for their own safety. My 5 month old dane is completely crate trained. She whines to potty. She's only in it when we are out or if I am too tired to deal with sleep zoomies otherwise she sleeps by my bed uncrated on her own bed. She will not budge or try getting on the bed. Crate training is a plus for many reasons.
      sigpic
      Mother to 4 human kids, 1 french bulldog (Duke), and 1 Great Dane (Madison) and 1 lionhead rabbit. My home is filled with love.

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      • #4
        I would most def crate train., who knows what will happen if left alone long enough for all you know your walls will get eaten lol.

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        • #5
          Another thing with crate trainingis ...if a dog needs to be crated/confined due to illness or injury or needs to stay at the vet or in a kennel they are far less stressed since they are already use to being confined. We can tell a big difference at the hospital between dogs that have been crate trained and those that haven't.
          sigpic
          Dale AKC CGC Evaluator
          Associate Member GDCNE
          Member GSPCA
          Member NAVHDA
          Member Central Maine Kennel Club
          High Hopes Great Danes & German Shorthairs

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          • #6
            Originally posted by kahluadanes View Post
            Another thing with crate trainingis ...if a dog needs to be crated/confined due to illness or injury or needs to stay at the vet or in a kennel they are far less stressed since they are already use to being confined. We can tell a big difference at the hospital between dogs that have been crate trained and those that haven't.
            Totally agree. My bully had a TPLO in the fall. I don't know how we would have maintained the necessary activity restrictions without crating.

            I also think it would be much harder to potty train without a crate.

            And of course, as already mentioned, the safety issues. As well as piece of mind knowing nothing bad will happen while you're trying to shower or get the mail
            sigpic
            Deb

            Duke and Ivy

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            • #7
              We tried going the Crate-less route. It almost ruined my relationship. I'm compleatly serious. We would have Castiel sleep in our bed, but he would squirm and move, and every time he shifted, I woke up, thinking he was trying to escape the bed. I got NO sleep, My partner got NO sleep. We started snapping at each other, fighting.....

              Then we got the crate. *hugs crate* He took to it like a duck to water I sware. We had it home for all of five minutes before he passed right out in it.

              We use it now when we go out (because Cas is still only 15 months, I don't trust him yet. but he gets small stints when I have to take out the trash or am just running to the store real quick. he's getting good!), or at night when we go to bed, or when we just can't deal with him cause we're both dead tired. Sometimes he actually does things he knows he's not supposed to to get put IN his crate. Usually when he's too tired, but doesn't want to just sleep out in the living room. He's got it into his head that he CAN"T just go in, and he's got to be a butt to be put into his crate. Werido.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by kahluadanes View Post
                Another thing with crate trainingis ...if a dog needs to be crated/confined due to illness or injury or needs to stay at the vet or in a kennel they are far less stressed since they are already use to being confined. We can tell a big difference at the hospital between dogs that have been crate trained and those that haven't.
                This - yes! I SO wish Logan was crate trained and we really did try when we adopted him but at 4 years old he just had an intense dislike of confined spaces and doesnt willingly ever choose to be in a crate. In the last 3 years he's had multiple surgeries and it is very difficult not having him crate trained. I have to wait until they are ready to take him back, wait while the procedure is performed, then go in and sit with him in an open area while he wakes up. If anyone tries to confine him he will injure himself. Then the recovery process is also more difficult - making sure doors are closed so he cant jump up on the beds and tear sutures, or run up & down the stairs. He cant even be confined to one room - paces, cries & drools.
                So... crate training -- YES -- for you AND for them!
                "I don’t care if a dog is 150 pounds or 10 pounds, and whether the issue is leash manners or biting visitors. There are no dogs who need a heavier hand—there are only trainers who need more knowledge and a lighter touch." Suzanne Clothier
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                Rocky & Emma
                Follow our adventures at
                www.instagram.com/spottedangels

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                • #9
                  Believe it or not I even crate train my cats. It makes transport to the vet so much nicer for everyone concerned. They don't freak out over being in a crate or being confined at the vet. They willingly go in the crates, they relax...so nice...unlike so many cats we get who freak at being in a crate and end up so stressed by the time they come in an exam room they become difficult to examine...
                  sigpic
                  Dale AKC CGC Evaluator
                  Associate Member GDCNE
                  Member GSPCA
                  Member NAVHDA
                  Member Central Maine Kennel Club
                  High Hopes Great Danes & German Shorthairs

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                  • #10
                    TWO great dane puppies? Crating gets a big hells yes from me in any case, but especially this one.
                    Katie & Scarlett
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                    • #11
                      You need 2 separate crates.
                      "The human language, as precise as it is with its thousands of words, can still be so wonderfully vague"....Garth Stein The Art of Racing in the Rain

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                      • #12
                        I adopted Mouse at 14 months and he wasn't crate-trained and I tried and tried. I really did, but he just hated the crate--and I didn't even shut the door on him while I was trying. He wouldn't be bribed or tricked into going in. You wouldn't believe how very looooong a great dane can make their neck in order to get the treats tossed into a crate while keeping their front feet absolutely out of it. I couldn't just leave it open with treats because my other two dogs love crates and would just go in, eat the treats, and then curl up and nap...

                        Luckily, Mouse is an absolute dream in the house, but if something happens and he needs to be confined for some reason, I'm not sure what I will do.
                        Tracy
                        sigpic
                        Mouse April 2010
                        Echo -- run free, Sweetie! Jan 9, 2007 - April 24, 2014 Lost to osteosarcoma at 7 years, 3 months. RIP.

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