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Success with Mom's dog (fingers crossed)

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  • Success with Mom's dog (fingers crossed)

    My mom has a female Tibetan Mastiff who Lola doesn't get along with. We think they're jealous having to share our attention, also they're both used to being the biggest dog around. First time there was a food bowl on the floor and they got in a fight over it, so we made sure food was never around. Then they were playing and both jumped for a toy at the same time and got in a fight. The final straw was when Lola grabbed a paper towel out of the garbage and they were going to fight over it.

    No serious injuries yet but lots of barking and growling, biting at each other's face, and they come away with a few scrapes. And they're really hard to pull apart (both 100+ pounds and stubborn)! We're worried someone's going to lose an eye or something, so we kept them separated. My parents live about 4 hours away, so we can't just leave her home...plus they live on a farm with a huge yard so it would be nice to have the dogs run around together. So now we're implementing project "Make these dogs get along".

    This weekend we went to visit my parents, who have now gotten another TM puppy (he's maybe 4 months old). We started by walking the big dogs on leash together a couple times, went great. Then Lola was outside playing with the puppy and the big TM was watching through the window, wagging her tail and whining to go out. So we let her and watched close, but they just had a great time chasing each other through the snow for a little while, no signs of aggression! It felt like such a victory!

    Anyone have any tips for us?

  • #2
    I'm glad they played well together, but frankly, I wouldn't trust the situation....it may not be over yet.
    since these dogs don't live in the same house, it's not completely necessary for them to encounter each other....so, you may want to keep them separate on your visits and not chance it. If this is impossible , then the dogs should on leashes when they are around each other as they have already had 3 fights. I'm worried about you getting hurt trying to separate them.
    If these dogs all live in the same house, I'd recommend a trainer to help
    just my 2 cents
    sigpicDanemommd
    Dante and Louis

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    • #3
      It's great that you had that victory, but two bitches of this size can and will fight to the death, and they never ever forget. I would be very careful from here on out, especially now that there is a young and very impressionable soon-to-be-a-giant puppy running around. So far it sounds like resource guarding, but it's hard to say from your post - I would definitely hire a trainer to come to your parents' house and watch all the dogs in action.

      I worry about the puppy because the female TM could begin to see him as hers, and Lola would be overstepping some pretty huge boundaries if this happens - and that means a fight. I personally wouldn't let these three dogs run around and play together unless both females are muzzled. That way you can really see what's going on when they're at play without risking a vet bill, and over time once you're convinced they are safe together and you have identified the triggers, the muzzles can come off.
      Katie & Scarlett
      sigpic

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      • #4
        We definitely don't trust them yet, it just seemed like this was a step in the right direction. It's frustrating because Lola gets along with everyone else (like at the dog park and doggy daycare).

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Meatos View Post
          It's great that you had that victory, but two bitches of this size can and will fight to the death, and they never ever forget. I would be very careful from here on out, especially now that there is a young and very impressionable soon-to-be-a-giant puppy running around. So far it sounds like resource guarding, but it's hard to say from your post - I would definitely hire a trainer to come to your parents' house and watch all the dogs in action.

          I worry about the puppy because the female TM could begin to see him as hers, and Lola would be overstepping some pretty huge boundaries if this happens - and that means a fight. I personally wouldn't let these three dogs run around and play together unless both females are muzzled. That way you can really see what's going on when they're at play without risking a vet bill, and over time once you're convinced they are safe together and you have identified the triggers, the muzzles can come off.
          It does seem like resource guarding. We thought that the puppy could be an issue too, so we were pretty surprised when the big TM wanted to play with them.

          The muzzle is a good idea, at least then they could run around together. Is there a certain type of muzzle we should get? I've never looked at them before...

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          • #6
            Well-fitting basket muzzles are the best - they can still pant, drink, breathe, etc.
            Katie & Scarlett
            sigpic

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            • #7
              Take it from someone who's been there and still there. Hire a trainer now, not in a week, now. We were missing so much body langauge going on between our two that our new trainer picked up on right away. We have lots of work ahead but we will get there. We use the basket muzzles on our two who don't get along but only in our back yard for supervised play time. These problems don't just go away on their own, it takes lots of hard work but you can get there with a good trainer.
              sigpic
              Buster

              RIP Jack Diesel Caliber and Bubbles. Mommy misses you guys every day!

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              • #8
                I recently watched a show on Animal Planet about these dogs (and I'm in awe that your parents have not 1 but 2, since they ar eso pricey lol .. WOW) but the show warned potential buyers (who saw the dogs on the show) of their personality traits and peculiar behaivor traits.

                #1 of the list was aggression and shyness (and biting because of being shy or aggressive) if not extremely socialized from puppyhood on, with females being super protective of their home.

                I googled and found some information for you. Hopefully it helps.

                Nowhere on our site do we promote scare tactics. We are simply stating reasonable, foreseeable management, containment and training techniques that the AVERAGE DOG OWNER may employ based on the known characteristics of the Tibetan Mastiff breed.

                These facts are simply not in question:
                • The AVERAGE Tibetan Mastiff likes to bark.
                • The AVERAGE Tibetan Mastiff likes to chew.
                • The AVERAGE Tibetan Mastiff being a guardian breed - is protective of home and family.
                • The AVERAGE Tibetan Mastiff is headstrong and independent.
                Therefore, keeping just these four of many facts in mind, it is merely common sense for the AVERAGE TIBETAN MASTIFF OWNER to assume the following:
                • The AVERAGE Tibetan Mastiff requires adequate space, mental stimulation and exercise.
                • The AVERAGE Tibetan Mastiff requires socialization and basic obedience training.
                • The AVERAGE Tibetan Mastiff requires a safely fenced yard.
                • The AVERAGE Tibetan Mastiff requires crate training.
                • The AVERAGE Tibetan Mastiff requires structure and firm leadership.
                Is the Tibetan Mastiff good with other animals and pets?

                The Tibetan Mastiff is generally very good with other animals when raised with them. However, animals unknown to the TM may or may not be welcome on his/her territory.


                I currently own a dog of another breed. Can I get a Tibetan Mastiff of the same gender?

                That depends. Because same sex aggression is not uncommon for Tibetan Mastiffs and other dominant breeds of similar size, it is strongly suggested that owners look to the oppposite gender when acquiring a Tibetan Mastiff.

                There is always the potential for constant struggles/fights between same sex adult dogs because of strong wills, assertive personalities and similar natural territorial characteristics. These problems seem to diminish substantially with smaller breeds of same sex.

                http://www.tibetanmastiffinfo.com/ar...-Mastiff.shtml
                sigpic
                A backyard breeder (BYB) is someone who has been deemed not a reputable breeder.

                A "Responsible Breeder" supports their buyers, supports their own dogs, and supports the lives of any fututre puppies by having (and keeping up with) all the appropriate health testing suggested by the GDCA.

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                • #9
                  That was great info, definitely describes my mom's dog...she's so independent we joke that she's more like a cat than a dog sometimes. The breeder that they got both from wouldn't let them get another female, they could only take a male, so the same-sex aggression definitely fits too.

                  I tried to get them to crate train when they got the first one. However, my dad is a big softy with the animals so they tried the crate a few nights then returned it, because the puppy cried and he felt bad. They did go through I think 3 obedience classes to help socialize her, but I suppose it's a whole different thing having another dog come to her place.

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