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  • Another tick!

    Can we please have winter now? I'm pretty much over these ticks!

    I wasn't able to get the whole thing out though.. I think part of the head is still stuck in him From my understanding, this shouldn't be a problem as long as I keep an eye on it and watch for infection? The area does look really red right now though. We wiped down the spot with some rubbing alcohol and will see what the next day or so brings.

    Seriously. I'm ready for snow.

  • #2
    Clean the area with a little peroxide and apply neosporin.
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    • #3
      Originally posted by Loki Love View Post
      Can we please have winter now? I'm pretty much over these ticks!

      I wasn't able to get the whole thing out though.. I think part of the head is still stuck in him From my understanding, this shouldn't be a problem as long as I keep an eye on it and watch for infection? The area does look really red right now though. We wiped down the spot with some rubbing alcohol and will see what the next day or so brings.

      Seriously. I'm ready for snow.
      My mom's surefire way to remove a tick completely is to grab it as close as possible to the skin with a tweezers and then twist counterclockwise (like you're unscrewing it from the dog - or person). It seems to work really well for her!

      Whenever I've removed a tick from a dog or a person, the area always looks red, and sometimes is swollen, even though there are no tick parts left behind. The only way I can tell if I've gotten the whole thing is if its legs are still waving around once it's out.

      Then I push it into some liquid soap. Ticks hate that - they can't crawl out of it, and they die within a minute or two. I don't like to put them down the drain because I imagine them crawling back out, and squashing them is messy. I keep the bowl by the sink, and by the end of summer, I have a little bowl of what looks like amber with ticks stuck inside!!

      But, yeah, I hate ticks too. There's something utterly disgusting about them. I got seven off of Bubbles today after she spent the afternoon in the woods with DH.
      sigpicBubbles the lap puppy

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      • #4
        LOL, I drove home in a pre-winter blizzard today soooo I wish I had your tick problem:P

        I like to pick them and then squish them under my finger nail. I promise I'm not a completely awful person... but I get satisfaction from the little "crack" those suckers make when you squish them. That'll teach them to bite my dogs:P
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        Moose - Male Great Dane - June 3, 2011
        Rush - Male Great Dane - April 8th, 2015 (MBPIS MBPIG Can. GCH Group Placing Paquestone's Intense Rush)

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        • #5
          Don't twist a tick when removing it , do a quick straight pull. Also if possible do not touch teh tick with your bare fingers.
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          • #6
            Originally posted by kahluadanes View Post
            Don't twist a tick when removing it , do a quick straight pull. Also if possible do not touch teh tick with your bare fingers.
            Yeah, I'm a straight puller here! Why shouldn't one touch the tick with their bare fingers? (Besides the obvious ewww factor!)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Loki Love View Post
              Yeah, I'm a straight puller here! Why shouldn't one touch the tick with their bare fingers? (Besides the obvious ewww factor!)
              Disease can be spread. Have had to take classes in regards to ticks & proper removal...one big thing that was stressed in every single class was to not touch with your bare hands and definitly not to split or crush with bare hands....we have been repeatedly told by human Drs as well as others in medical that as vets & vet techs we are in a high risk for contacting tick borne diseases because of the contact we have with ticks.If you come incontact with a tick with your bare hands you need to make sure that you wash your hands thoroughly asap with a good antibacterial soap and water.
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              • #8
                Originally posted by kahluadanes View Post
                Don't twist a tick when removing it , do a quick straight pull. Also if possible do not touch teh tick with your bare fingers.
                Why not, why, and why not? I'm not trying to be argumentative, but I'd like to know your reasoning.

                A quick pull is more likely to result in snapping the tick and leaving a piece behind. I think this is why the twisting works so well for my mom - what it really does is make sure she's removing it slowly. Here's a website that shows a lot of videos of ticks being removed by twisting (fun, if you're into that sort of thing). I've never tried the device they use, but the videos are inspiring!

                http://www.otom.com/how-to-remove-a-tick

                I can't think of any reason not to touch a tick with your bare fingers, unless you have a wound. Even then, for the tick to transmit any tick-borne illnesses to you (like Lyme Disease or Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever), its saliva would have to get inside your open wound.

                No matter how we remove them, I think we can all agree that it's important not to squeeze on the tick's abdomen when removing it, because this can cause them to squirt diseases into the animal they're attached to.
                sigpicBubbles the lap puppy

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by TMedic37 View Post
                  LOL, I drove home in a pre-winter blizzard today soooo I wish I had your tick problem:P

                  I like to pick them and then squish them under my finger nail. I promise I'm not a completely awful person... but I get satisfaction from the little "crack" those suckers make when you squish them. That'll teach them to bite my dogs:P
                  I love to do that with fleas!! I don't get much chance to anymore, though, unless I visit the shelter and play with the kitties.

                  Definitely wash my hands after that, though - ingesting yucky flea insides accidentally can lead to tapeworms!
                  sigpicBubbles the lap puppy

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ChaoticLiving View Post
                    Why not, why, and why not? I'm not trying to be argumentative, but I'd like to know your reasoning.

                    A quick pull is more likely to result in snapping the tick and leaving a piece behind. I think this is why the twisting works so well for my mom - what it really does is make sure she's removing it slowly. Here's a website that shows a lot of videos of ticks being removed by twisting (fun, if you're into that sort of thing). I've never tried the device they use, but the videos are inspiring!

                    http://www.otom.com/how-to-remove-a-tick

                    I can't think of any reason not to touch a tick with your bare fingers, unless you have a wound. Even then, for the tick to transmit any tick-borne illnesses to you (like Lyme Disease or Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever), its saliva would have to get inside your open wound.

                    No matter how we remove them, I think we can all agree that it's important not to squeeze on the tick's abdomen when removing it, because this can cause them to squirt diseases into the animal they're attached to.
                    All I can tell you that every training/class session we've ever had has told us to NOT twist a tick when removing it to do a quick direct pull...I've had many such classes over the past many years of being a vet tech....also every session especially recent ones has been very strict about not using bare hands to remove ticks..to use tweezers,tick puller, paper towel, tissue, guaze, etc to remove them...Also been told over & over that vets & techs are at high risk of tick borne diseases because of the many ticks they come in contact with.....3 of the techs I work with have already been tested due to symptoms and their own Drs all told them the same thing..so I think I will go with my training and what the Human Drs and other medical personel have directed us....I'd ratehr be safe then sorry...
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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by kahluadanes View Post
                      Disease can be spread. Have had to take classes in regards to ticks & proper removal...one big thing that was stressed in every single class was to not touch with your bare hands and definitly not to split or crush with bare hands....we have been repeatedly told by human Drs as well as others in medical that as vets & vet techs we are in a high risk for contacting tick borne diseases because of the contact we have with ticks.If you come incontact with a tick with your bare hands you need to make sure that you wash your hands thoroughly asap with a good antibacterial soap and water.
                      Well, I stand corrected! Sorry, I must have been writing my post when your posted yours, so now it just looks like I totally ignored this answer!

                      I did a little looking on my own, and everything I found supports your statement that we shouldn't touch ticks with our bare fingers. It still seems far-fetched to me that one could pick up disease that way, since tick-borne diseases have to get into our bloodstream, but I guess it's best not to take chances.

                      Any soap will do, though. The "anti-bacterial" soaps with triclosan aren't any better at killing bacteria than regular soaps - all soap will kill bacteria. Promoting triclosan-containing soap was fantastic marketing, but I'm pretty sure the research shows that it actually does way more harm than good in general. It is an endocrine disruptor and mimics thyroid hormone, so even in low doses it can be harmful, and it has been shown to increase antibiotic resistance. Here is a good article describing what we currently know about anti-bacterial soaps:

                      http://www.healthandsocietyscholars....6/26872/295605

                      OK, now I'll get off my soapbox!
                      sigpicBubbles the lap puppy

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by kahluadanes View Post
                        All I can tell you that every training/class session we've ever had has told us to NOT twist a tick when removing it to do a quick direct pull...I've had many such classes over the past many years of being a vet tech....also every session especially recent ones has been very strict about not using bare hands to remove ticks..to use tweezers,tick puller, paper towel, tissue, guaze, etc to remove them...Also been told over & over that vets & techs are at high risk of tick borne diseases because of the many ticks they come in contact with.....3 of the techs I work with have already been tested due to symptoms and their own Drs all told them the same thing..so I think I will go with my training and what the Human Drs and other medical personel have directed us....I'd ratehr be safe then sorry...
                        Aack! You did it to me again! Stop posting while I'm writing!!

                        Your answer makes sense to me, except for the quick pull. In my experience, a quick pull leads to mouthparts being left behind more often than a slow steady pull.
                        sigpicBubbles the lap puppy

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                        • #13
                          LOL, Thanks for the "soap" link
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                          • #14
                            Ugh, I just pulled a tick out of Scarlett today. Found it on her neck just above the shoulders and thought it was a skin tag at first. I was surprised that it came off when I tugged it and only then did I realise it was a tick.

                            Head is still in there, cos I'm an idiot. I saturated the area (which has a nice red bump now) with lavender oil and now I'm all paranoid that I did it with my bare hands! I can't find the exact bite spot because of all her black hair.

                            Planning to go to the vet tomorrow, if I'm guessing right, she picked it up last Sunday at the barn. So it has been there for a week!! I'm not in the habit of checking for ticks and I'm surprised I didn't notice it earlier.

                            She's acting fine but I'm all paranoid because a friend of ours was about a day away from putting his dog down for cancer, only to realise at the 11th hour that it was lyme disease! At least it can be cleared up quickly with antibiotics.
                            Katie & Scarlett
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                            • #15
                              Don't be paranoid...leaving the head behind isn't usually a big deal..simply clean the area and apply a bit of neosporin. As far as Lyme disease...only the Deer tick transmits Lyme disease...it also will take @ 3 months before you would even be able to test to find if there was Lyme Disease present even if it was a deer tick. Not all Deer Ticks transmit Lyme Disease.
                              This is why dogs in areas where ticks are known to be present should be treated with a tick product.
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