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  • Trooper boy
    started a topic Ivermectin

    Ivermectin

    If you have your dogs on Heartguard every month and want to switch them to the type of Ivomectin that they give cattle and other animals do you have to get a heartworm test done first.? Thanks for any info.

  • DextersMomma
    replied
    If you ask most vets today, they will tell you that the Ivermectin in white footed breeds (collie like breeds) isn't as toxic as they once thought and most don't have an issue since it is such a low dosage.

    Yes I am a vet. I don't usually recommend the cattle ivomec in place of a HW product due to liability issues and also that way the company can pay for the treatment if the client follows the manufacturers recommendations for giving it.

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  • DaneFolly
    replied
    Originally posted by Greenmagick View Post
    I have seen this, and I avoided it up until recently. I saw a website about the gene (I think its a gene?) that causes the issue and the percent of each breed it affects....danes werent even on it and it went really low...so I felt ok switching.
    Do you have a link to the website? I'd like to switch Leo, but I want to find out if it's safe for my pom mix too.

    Leave a comment:


  • Greenmagick
    replied
    Originally posted by seachainanmadra View Post
    I've also read that Danes can be Ivermectin sensitive, but I haven't seen this often, and not from an entirely reliable source. Anyone had a problem?
    I have seen this, and I avoided it up until recently. I saw a website about the gene (I think its a gene?) that causes the issue and the percent of each breed it affects....danes werent even on it and it went really low...so I felt ok switching.

    I got some from the feed store, but I didnt see the injectable 1%. My vet figured the doses for me based on what I got, which is paste and 2.87%

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  • seachainanmadra
    replied
    Originally posted by BigLittleSmall View Post
    I also read that collie breeds are not supposed to have this .. as it can cross the blood/brain barrier. yikes!
    This is the entire reason I haven't used the injectible Ivermectin, but I'm thinking I may switch Stavro and Banksy and leave my Aussie on Interceptor.

    FWIW, vets seem to go back and forth on whether the Collie-type Ivermectin sensitivity is a legitimate concern. I've argued and argued this with vets that carry nothing but Heartgard. For several years I've gone to a vet that breeds Aussies, and as a result, they do not even sell Heartgard. Better safe than sorry.

    I've also read that Danes can be Ivermectin sensitive, but I haven't seen this often, and not from an entirely reliable source. Anyone had a problem?

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  • BigLittleSmall
    replied
    Thanks for all your responses. It's nice ot see the same response instead of 16 different ones!

    Originally posted by riloburnham View Post
    When giving something like that how do you consider the bodies absorption rate. I understand that in the oral form it would absorb much slower than the injectable form given orally. How do account for this when prescribing injectable to be given orally. Do any veterinarians on the site have a comment?
    I read that the reason it is suggested to give it oraly, instead of injecting, was that IF it made the dog sick .. the dog would simply vomit it up .. and not absorb the full dosage .. unlike with injecting .. where they just have to take what they got.

    I also read that collie breeds are not supposed to have this .. as it can cross the blood/brain barrier. yikes!

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  • riloburnham
    replied
    I appreciate the response from Dexter. Aren't you a veterinarian? I have wanted to give liquid ivermectin but I have always had concerns about giving this for fear of over or under dosing. When giving something like that how do you consider the bodies absorption rate. I understand that in the oral form it would absorb much slower than the injectable form given orally. How do account for this when prescribing injectable to be given orally. Do any veterinarians on the site have a comment?

    Leave a comment:


  • OMD
    replied
    here is a link with shopping results


    http://www.google.com/search?sourcei...a096ba63ca8429

    Stephanie

    Leave a comment:


  • Harlequin Dane
    replied
    Crystal makes a good point in mentioning that using the liquid form is extra label use. Discussing alternative treatment with your vet is always recommended, especially in the event of an adverse reaction.

    Having said that, all I can share is what we have personally done with our danes (and past rescues). We have used liquid ivermectin for over 20yrs, all remained HW-. We have used it to assist treating demo, HW+, and as HWP (preventative). We used to use the 1cc/100#, but for the last 10+yrs we use it at a lower dosage - a tenth of a cc per 44# (not mixed or diluted). All of our danes and rescues remain HW-. This has always been discussed, approved and monitored by our vet.

    PS - we get a 60ml bottle for $32 at the feed store. Have seen it for a little less online, shipping (unless free) can bump it up to the same or more than if purchased locally.
    Last edited by Harlequin Dane; 10-27-2010, 10:44 AM.

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  • bluebeetlemom
    replied
    I have my dogs on the cattle ivermectin. 0.1cc/10lbs of body weight. I do not dilute. I draw it up and squirt it into bread, then glob some peanut butter on it. No refusals this way.This was the first year I used it. I will not use it over the winter, will do a HW test in the spring before resuming.

    Leave a comment:


  • DextersMomma
    replied
    I just wanted to make sure and point out that you should never use any other product other than ivermectin/HG if your pet is HW+, you can kill your pet. This is because other products cause a fast kill of the heartworms and that can be too fast and can be fatal if they are positive.

    HG is basically ivermectin and pyrantel injected into the beef treats. I would follow your vet's recommendations as far as what they recommend and the dose they give you if you are doing oral ivermectin. Make sure you weigh them frequently so you are giving adequate amounts. I would do it year round and every 30 days.

    To clarify, ivermectin kills microfilaria, L3, and L4 larvae; not just microfiliria.

    Here is a link to the American Heartworm Society. http://www.heartwormsociety.org/vete...uidelines.html

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  • reynosa_k9's
    replied
    Many rescues use the slow-kill method w/ivermectin and doxy. I know of at least 4 in this area (the RGV), another near Port Isabel, 1 in Dallas, and another in Nevada use it. I know there many others but these are the ones I've worked with/fostered for.
    I've used it on several dogs and all were negative within a year. None had any adverse side effects.

    Here's a report on it;

    http://www.dogaware.com/health/heartworm.html

    Leave a comment:


  • Brindle baby
    replied
    for those that give it do you mix it with propylene glycol?

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  • Susanne
    replied
    Depends...I start my babies on ivermectin at 4 months and have a yearly HW test.

    BUT when I took in another GD he was 3 at the time, he was HW (weak) positive, hookworm & roundworm infected. I recommend the treatment from a Veterinary first. It took a year before we got HW neg on my boy, then I started the invermectin.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Walnuts
    replied
    Originally posted by SusRob0674 View Post
    We do it every 6 to 8 weeks. Your only killing the microfilaria not the worms themselves. It takes about 6 months for them to develop into adult worms after infecting the dog.
    So are you saying you recommend HW treatment first and Ivermectin as preventative once you have a nagative? (assuming you're positive at the start)

    Leave a comment:

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