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  • Is a Great Dane for me?

    Hello all! I am considering a Great Dane and after a bit of research, I beileve it is the right breed for me! I have contacted a breeder from Louisville and got her to go down to 1000$ for a Blue. However I still have some hesitations about getting one,that's where I'm hoping this forum will come in!

    How do you keep your house from smelling bad?
    How do you keep him from destroying your house?
    How do you keep him from taking up all the room in your house?
    Finally, is 1000$ too much to pay for a pup?

  • #2
    Welcome!

    The first thing you should do is check out the section "the abc's of buying a purebred puppy'. Make sure you a buying a good puppy from a responsible, ethical breeder. $1000 is definitely not too much to pay for a puppy, if anything it is on the low side of what to expect to spend on a well bred Dane pup. If the cost of the pup is a concern you might want to reconsider-- buying a Great Dane will be the cheapest part of owning one. He will require XL equipment and accessories, thousands in quality food, x sized vet bills, and training. Just something to consider. You might also consider rescuing, for much less money.

    Answers to your other questions:

    For smell, you have to regularly clean and wash your dog's bed and accessories. And keep him reasonably clean, although Dane's don't need heavy grooming. Still, all dogs smell like dog. You can manage it, but it's part of the package. Don't worry, you won't smell it as you progres , crazy dog person status

    He will need training to not destroy your house, like any other dog. Crate training is also highly recommended, to keep him and your house safe when you can't always be there.

    And they will take over your whole house. And you'll love it

    There is a lot of info in these forums, do lots of research before making a commitment. Everyone here loves dane and is happy to help.
    sigpic

    Peach, merle Great Dane
    Born July 7 2014
    Peach & Emily!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by StarWars_Danes View Post
      Hello all! I am considering a Great Dane and after a bit of research, I beileve it is the right breed for me! I have contacted a breeder from Louisville and got her to go down to 1000$ for a Blue. However I still have some hesitations about getting one,that's where I'm hoping this forum will come in!

      Welcome! The great Dane is a wonderful breed.


      How do you keep your house from smelling bad? Your house won't smell bad unless your puppy decides to constantly poop/pee in it and is never properly potty trained. I would say cats smell worse than dogs do, because there litter box is inside. If you keep the dog clean and properly potty trained, there should be no reason why your house would smell bad.
      How do you keep him from destroying your house? Training Training as a puppy is key. You want the puppy to know that toys are his/hers, while your stuff is your stuff. You should crate train this puppy, since while you are away that would make sure that he/she doesn't chew up things. I just got back from work, and my dane Willow isn't crate trained. She just destroyed an expensive pair of shoes . And she's a 17 month old puppy.
      How do you keep him from taking up all the room in your house? Great Danes will take up all the room in your house....and you'll love it! There's really no stopping it
      Finally, is 1000$ too much to pay for a pup? Check out the ABCs of buying a purebred Great Dane from a reputable breeder. That is the key to having a healthy puppy that could live 10+ years. Your breeder should only breed colors within the standard, show to champion, and health test for hips, eyes, thyroid, and cardiac. If your breeder you have chosen doesn't meet this criteria, then move on. $1,000 sounds a little cheap for me, actually. I mean, all the showing and health testing is going in to this puppy, and that costs money. This could be a reputable breeder just selling a $1,000 puppy, or it could be a byb trying to get $1,000 out of a dog they put nothing in to. If the price of simply the puppy is worrying you, and if you think $1,000 is too much, then a Great Dane may not be right for you. Especially if you are also worried about it taking over your house
      .....
      Last edited by 21softballstar; 07-21-2016, 07:29 AM.
      sigpic
      Willow and Liv

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      • #4
        $1000 for a blue from a responsible breeder that shows and health tests (xrays, etc, not just a vet check up) is a very low price. Also, any breeder that negotiates on price is one I would run away from...responsible breeders don't have to haggle on price, they have waiting lists of people, waiting for a puppy.

        My dogs don't smell, they eat a raw diet. High quality kibble will also reduce the doggy smell. Low quality kibble you can buy in walmart or a grocery store can make dogs smell bad. Crap in, crap out. Of course, regular washing of bedding is necessary, just like with people clothing and bedding. You WILL vacuum and sweep and mop a lot.

        You need to do some more research on basic puppy and dog care. Crate training is HIGHLY recommended these days to keep your puppy and your house safe. Would you let a human toddler or pre-schooler have the run of your house while you weren't watching them? You can wean them off the crate after they have reached maturity--at about three years old! Training classes starting as a puppy (as soon as they can safely go, vaccinations and such) and into adulthood are highly recommended. Find a force -free training class that uses positive reinforcement. Age-appropriate exercise is highly recommended. Puppies should have access to outside free play on grass or dirt several times a day (or in a big carpeted area inside if the weather is uncooperative). As they get older, puppies need to be able to run and play hard until they are truly tired EVERY DAY. A tired puppy is a good puppy and contrary to what you hear all the time--great dane puppies are NOT couch potatoes. After the age of two or three, some danes do prefer sleeping and cuddling. Positively training obedience, manners, and tricks at home builds your emotional bond with your dog and wears them out because they have to think.

        A giant dog is a giant commitment. A giant dog lacking owner commitment is a giant problem. A lot of danes end up surrendered or in rescue at about the age of 12-18 months, and it's not the dogs' fault--it's clueless or non-committed owners that think great danes (or dogs in general) are easy care and "cool" to own--and then they discover their lack of commitment has created a 140# disaster and they wash their hands of it.
        Tracy
        sigpic
        Mouse April 2010
        Echo -- run free, Sweetie! Jan 9, 2007 - April 24, 2014 Lost to osteosarcoma at 7 years, 3 months. RIP.

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        • #5
          I hope this doesn't come off as rude or harsh, but I do want to be real here. No, currently I'd say that a Great Dane is not for you. And this is why:

          1. If you're buying a blue from a breeder who negotiated down to $1,000, you're buying from a backyard breeder, which means you haven't done any research about how to find an ethically bred puppy. It's good that you've come across this forum, as it's a great place to get your research started.

          2. If you think $1,000 is a high price tag, then I worry about your understanding of the financial commitment of owning a giant breed. Everything is more expensive - vet bills, medication, crates, toys, food, collars, etc. My puppy at one point ate $175 in food a month. He just turned a year old, and I have spent well over $5,000 on his basic care and upkeep in the 9.5 months I've had him in my home.

          $1,000 is very cheap for a well bred Great Dane puppy. Most ethical breeders I know have price tags anywhere from $1,500 - $3,000. And they aren't making a profit. Health testing, showing, titling, upkeep - those are all very expensive propositions. Anyone who is charging $1,000 for a puppy is probably not doing all of those things.

          3. If you're worried about a dog taking up all of the room in your house, don't get a Great Dane. And if you're worried about your house smelling bad or other cleanliness issues, don't get a Great Dane. Some of them don't drool at all, and some of them (like my one year old) drool constantly.

          4. If you're not 100% sure that you're committed to the idea, then don't get one. This is a decade-long decision, not an 'until it stops working out or gets too hard or too expensive to keep' decision.

          A few questions - What research have you done so far? Do you know anything about the major health concerns of the breed, especially bloat? Do you know the specific dietary requirements necessary for proper giant breed growth? How big is your car? Do you own a home or rent? Is breed discrimination allowed in your state? If so, are Danes are the restricted list if you have homeowner's insurance? How much can you afford in the case of a medical emergency? Can you afford health insurance payments? Can you afford training classes?

          These are all questions you should ask yourself before jumping into getting a giant breed puppy.

          A Great Dane *could* work for you eventually, after you really consider the answers to those questions and how committed you are. And after you research how to find an ethical breeder and locate one who is willing to sell you a companion. I'm not saying it's a "never". But I'm definitely saying that this puppy you've found right now is not a good choice for you.
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          • #6
            I second everything mnmouse said. The first thing you should probably do is forget this blue puppy. With a good breeder, you don't "get them down" to a lower price. Any breeder who negotiates price with someone is most likely not someone you want to buy from. And you're highly unlikely to find a well bred blue for $1,000 - try twice that. If price is going to be a factor, consider a different color (fawn/brindle tends to cost less depending on where you live) or consider a rescue. Danes are very expensive, and the purchase price of a puppy is a drop in the bucket compared to what you'll spend in the first year or two alone.

            The best thing to do is locate a RESPONSIBLE breeder and ask to visit them and their dogs. Spend some time with Danes to see what you're in for. All puppies are work, and Dane puppies are more work because of their large size. Do some more research about basic puppy care. It sounds like you're not quite prepared for it. Read through old threads on this forum and do some more research into finding a good breeder. I highly recommend going to some dog shows. Dane specialities are shows just for Danes and a great place to find good breeders. You can go to infodog.com to find shows near you. I found it really helpful to meet with and talk to Dane breeders, and I actually met my puppy's breeder at a show.

            Another thing you might think about is getting an adult Dane. The first 2-3 years are a ton of work, and you really have to put in a lot of time and effort to get a nice well-behaved adult Dane. Everyone always wants a puppy, but I've really enjoyed getting Asaah (the harl in my sig pic) as an adult. It was so much less work and she has bonded with me just as well as a puppy. Just something to consider.
            sigpic
            Chaucey
            Asaah ~ xxx Asaah LaLa, CGC, registered therapy dog

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            • #7
              Originally posted by oshagcj914 View Post
              I second everything mnmouse said. The first thing you should probably do is forget this blue puppy. With a good breeder, you don't "get them down" to a lower price. Any breeder who negotiates price with someone is most likely not someone you want to buy from. And you're highly unlikely to find a well bred blue for $1,000 - try twice that. If price is going to be a factor, consider a different color (fawn/brindle tends to cost less depending on where you live) or consider a rescue. Danes are very expensive, and the purchase price of a puppy is a drop in the bucket compared to what you'll spend in the first year or two alone.

              The best thing to do is locate a RESPONSIBLE breeder and ask to visit them and their dogs. Spend some time with Danes to see what you're in for. All puppies are work, and Dane puppies are more work because of their large size. Do some more research about basic puppy care. It sounds like you're not quite prepared for it. Read through old threads on this forum and do some more research into finding a good breeder. I highly recommend going to some dog shows. Dane specialities are shows just for Danes and a great place to find good breeders. You can go to infodog.com to find shows near you. I found it really helpful to meet with and talk to Dane breeders, and I actually met my puppy's breeder at a show.

              Another thing you might think about is getting an adult Dane. The first 2-3 years are a ton of work, and you really have to put in a lot of time and effort to get a nice well-behaved adult Dane. Everyone always wants a puppy, but I've really enjoyed getting Asaah (the harl in my sig pic) as an adult. It was so much less work and she has bonded with me just as well as a puppy. Just something to consider.
              Sometimes there are deals to be gotten in the pet quality area. I got $500 off my Dane as he had a bent tail (hardly noticeable). I told the breeder I wanted a show quality, but I had no intention of showing him. The breeder said I have just the dog for you. I got some kind of restricted AKC papers if I remember right, but I never bothered to send them in as they were worthless to me.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by martycurt View Post
                Sometimes there are deals to be gotten in the pet quality area. I got $500 off my Dane as he had a bent tail (hardly noticeable). I told the breeder I wanted a show quality, but I had no intention of showing him. The breeder said I have just the dog for you. I got some kind of restricted AKC papers if I remember right, but I never bothered to send them in as they were worthless to me.
                I don't know ethical breeders who make "deals". Unless they are selling blind/deaf puppies for the cost of the BAER test, of course.

                ETA: To mention, after re-reading this I thought I should add I think harle/harle breeders are more and more often being considered disreputable, but there are still some major well known breeding operations who breed harle/harle and risk white puppies, so that's why I included the BAER test example.

                Price is calculated based on how much it cost the breeder to produce that puppy and health test/title/care for the parents. Just because the puppy has a bent tail doesn't mean it cost less to produce, or is a lesser companion. If the puppy had an issue that would be potentially problematic in the future, I can see the price being lowered. Otherwise, not so much.

                OP, ethical breeders don't make deals or bargain down as a pretty standard rule. I suggest you calculate your budget and find someone who is breeding health tested adults and producing healthy puppies and pay what they're asking. Negotiating like you're buying a car with a dent and therefore you want some money off is not the way puppy buying should be handled.
                Last edited by Hiraeth; 07-21-2016, 05:35 PM.
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                • #9
                  Originally posted by StarWars_Danes View Post
                  how do you keep your house from smelling bad?
                  How do you keep him from destroying your house?
                  How do you keep him from taking up all the room in your house?
                  Finally, is 1000$ too much to pay for a pup?
                  The answer to your first 3 questions is YOU DONT. There is an insane amount of cleaning involved, an insane amount of space involved, and "casualties" as we like to call them in our house ( you know - things like the eye glasses on the coffee table that must have looked like a nylabone?!?! Not one but twice! .... Then the human finally got smart)

                  Just to put it bluntly - Danes are hella expensive. Between purchase price, food, supplies, training, vet care, emergency vet bills, boarding or care while you may be away ..... They are so expensive!!! Not to mention the time they take as puppies. My newest Dane (and 4th Dane) is about to be 11 months old. Since 3 months old we have gone to training classes 2 times a week, countless play dates for socialization ( no one wants an unruly teenage Dane!!!!! Dangerous and NO fun!). Not to mention the energy this juvenile Dane has...so we spend hours playing ball, chase, working obedience to try to drain him.

                  And I have to agree with others - any breeder willing to haggle on price more than likely is not reputable.... Please visit the ABC's of Puppy Buying. Danes already have a lot going against them - making sure you buy from a responsible breeder just helps you be sure that those odds are stacked on your favor. Not to mention being a first time Dane owner, you will have the wonderful support of a great breeder. Danes are a huge commitment........ I can't imagine my house without one, but they are not for the neat freak, not for those who don't have the time or money, and certainly not for those who don't want to keep them in the house as apart of the family ( no matter how much room they take up!)

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                  • #10
                    I agree, if the initial price of just buying a puppy is such an issue already, sorry to say but you are in for a big surprise. Danes are expensive to own (the right way). From a reputable breeder (which the one you are looking at is not) you should expect to spend anywhere from 1500-3000 or more depending on color and lineage. That will be the smallest amount you can expect to spend on that dog over it's lifetime. Heck, one of the members here last year racked up something like 20K in emergency vet bills last year, I bought a new car after getting my first dane because a 2 door for escape isn't exactly easy to get in and out of, regular vet bills (which are a lot more expensive then a normal sized dog, good quality food will cost thousands each year, toys, collars, leashes, dog beds, etc those are all the things you need to consider before getting a puppy let alone a dane. Not how much it cost just to buy the puppy. I'd say your not ready for the commitment of owning a dane yet. You may want to wait a couple years and do a little more research before you jump in to it, only to find out its not all glitz and glam and end up rehoming the puppy because you got in over your head.
                    Last edited by Kumah; 07-22-2016, 07:27 AM.
                    ~Kelsey, mom to~
                    Kumah-merle Great Dane 4 years
                    Nala-fawn Great Dane 2 months
                    Cece- Calico 4 years
                    Sammy- Black Domestic Long Hair 3 years
                    Tyke- 4 months

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                    • #11
                      I have to agree that Danes are an expensive breed. I am shocked at how much I am spending on just food alone. I always wanted to add a second Dane but now I don't know how I would afford the food! Just imagine this, my dane was eating 9 to 10 cups a day of food on a decent quality food ($55 for a 30lb bag). Insurance (a must for a breed with a lot of health issues), food, normal medical needs (flea/tick/hw preventative) really adds up. Everything is more expensive because they are so stinking big. If you are not looking to spend a lot of money on your dog I would not get a dane.

                      The other question was about keeping the house clean. I am known to keep a very clean home. I have had many different breeds and along with my dane have a swiss mountain dog. I also have had cats (still have one) and I currently have a house rabbit. My dane is my most recent pet added to the family. I noticed when my dane came in that my house was noticeably dirtier. I think the biggest issue is the drool. I am walking around wiping drool off of everything every week. When they shake it fly's everywhere. It is on the walls, furniture and even the ceiling. When they are not shaking it is dripping on the floor so I am cleaning my floors a lot more often. My dane does shed less than my other dog however which is one positive.

                      As far as taking up space, when my dog is running he is outside and when he is inside he is laying and he curls into a tiny ball. I honestly don't think he takes up that much room in the home but the giant dog beds that are needed do. Unless you don't mind giving up at least half the couch to them. A young active dane may feel more intrusive in the home vs. a mature calm couch potato.

                      So, can you deal with the drool, cost of care and large dog beds laying around? Have you considered rescuing an adult? It might be a better way to dip your feet in the water.
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                      • #12
                        Oh and people have already mentioned this breeder is probably not reputable. Saving money on the purchase is NOT ideal even though it seems like it would be. The money saved purchasing a poorly bred dane may result in high vet bills for health issues or behavioral issues later. This breed has so many issues already when everything is done perfectly I would not chance it. Lots of members here can help you find a responsible breeder if you decide this is the breed you want. Thank you for asking these questions before just running out and getting a dog!
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                        • #13
                          Welcome! I like to think of Great Danes as a lifestyle choice and a family member, not as a pet. So, no matter the challenges that come with them, I'm willing to take them on because this breed is truly life-changing.

                          How do you keep your house from smelling bad? - I can't always manage that. We removed all of the carpet and installed hard floors before our pup arrived, but the big area rugs still need shampooed at times. We feed raw, so our boy isn't terribly stinky but during rainy or humid days, he still has a distinct doggie smell. I also give him a shower every couple of weeks. Scentsy is a nice tool in the house too.

                          How do you keep him from destroying your house? Supervision. But, be prepared to have casualties. Mine is a year old now and seems pretty trustworthy, but just last week he went to lie on my bed and sleep so I left him there while I went and sat on the couch. When I went in the bedroom I found that he'd woken up at some point and chewed the entire corner off of one corner post on the bed. I can't get mad; it's my own fault. He'd napped on the bed alone many times before, but that day he decided...hey, this is nice to chew on.

                          How do you keep him from taking up all the room in your house? I don't. He's underfoot all of the time. I love it.

                          Finally, is 1000$ too much to pay for a pup? No, far from it. To me, $1,000 seems like back yard breeder price, especially for a blue Dane. More reputable breeders are in the $2,000 and up range for fawns, and the blues typically fetch more (many breeders also add the price of cropping if you are interested in that, but some include it). As others have said, they're an expensive breed. I choose to feed raw, which isn't typically as expensive as high-quality kibble, and I'm still spending around $150.00 per month on meat because right now he's growing and eats about four pounds of meat per day. I don't give flea or heartworm control because I raised my boy holistically, but there are still routine things that come up and periodic blood tests to check for parasite microfilariae. If you do treat in the traditional manner, it's expensive for worming, vaccines, etc. for giant breeds. I also bought a different car when we got him because he goes with me almost everywhere, so does that payment count? Emergency expenses can crop up with Danes (illnesses that are associated with giant breeds aren't uncommon, as well as freak injuries that these giants incur) that will bring you to your knees if you aren't prepared with insurance or an emergency slush fund. I keep a credit card account solely dedicated to my dog in the event that he has an emergency.

                          I won't say you're not ready, as many here have implied. Most people are surprised at first to learn about the needs of this breed. It doesn't mean you're not ready, it just means you need to study up and understand what they require. They aren't for the faint of heart, but the are a breed that is totally worth it because they're unlike any other breed.
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                          • #14
                            I'm not going to reiterate what everyone else has said, but provide a real-life experience.

                            I purchased my first dane for $500 from a BYB. In the first year alone, I had around $10k in vet bills. By the time I lost him when he was 6, my vet expenses alone topped $35k. That doesnt include the special diet that I had to feed him because he couldnt handle most food (about $350/month). Add in everything else (training, treats, beds, toys, etc), there was probably another $10-15k in expenses over the course of his life. Basically, I could have bought a Porsche for the amount of money I spent on him (and, as others have said, this does not include the cost of buying a new car just to accommodate his size).

                            This is an extreme example, but I know of other people (some on this board) who have had the same experience with a giant breed with a multitude of health issues.

                            That said, despite the expense of my first dane, I could not imagine life without having one of these giants.

                            *Edit* I forgot to mention, I was an idiot and didnt have pet insurance. Learn from me. Get pet insurance.
                            Last edited by kevlar930; 07-25-2016, 10:34 AM.

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