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  • nervous peeing?

    My Dane is 8 months old and she is a VERY nervous peer. Whenever you get too harsh to her like speaking in a stern voice she cowers and pees... is this a Dane thing or is it just her personality? Am I the only person getting tired of her ruining my comforters when I yell at her to get off the bed????
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  • #2
    I don't have anything in the way of the nervous peeing.. but, why not try to make getting off the bed fun?

    Maybe show her a tasty treat and toss it on the floor (with an exaggerated motion) and when she goes for it, say "Off" or whatever word you're going to use. But say it happily. And tell her how amazing and smart and good she is and pet and love on her on the floor. Then invite her up onto the bed and don't pay her any special attention up there, rinse and repeat.

    Then (hopefully) you won't have to yell at her to get off the bed.. she'll just get off when you tell her to without her being frightened.
    - Missy

    Tristan, born 3/23/10
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    • #3
      Work with her on the OFF command in different set up situations using something she really loves, and a quiet voice since a loud one makes her pee when scared. Guide her to the floor with the treat and say OFF. Be low key and praise her for a job well done
      Do sessions of training a few minutes everyday until she knows what you want, then add a hand signal meaning OFF. For myself I snap my fingers and point in the direction I want the dog to go saying OFF. After a while I don't have to say the word anymore.
      If she knows what's expected of her she'll hopefully be more confident and less likely to pee. Try not to yell at her if you can help it, I know it's frustrating, but it's not helping.
      Someone with more experience may have a better plan.

      Dawne

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      • #4
        Um.... Then don't yell at her to get off the bed.

        Several choices here.
        Toss a treat and make it fun as already suggested, though if she's a submissive pee-er, she's probably an excited one too and you may get dribble if you make it *too* fun.

        Close the bedroom door or gate the bedroom and make the bed off limits.

        Put a leash on her and calmly walk her off the bed. You may want to teach her that you approaching her with a leash is a good thing, and you may want to work on this outside or on a non-porous inside surface.
        Until one has loved an animal, part of one's soul remains unawakened.
        - Anatole France

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        • #5
          No, you are not the only one! My Tia Maria, was a pee-er when she was a puppy. She peed when I scolded her, she peed when she was excited, she peed when she was nervous, she peed whenever she saw my best friend Diana - every. single. time. It was really frustrating! She just peed to pee, I swear! Sometimes she would just jump up on my bed and pee. I don't know how she has lived to be 2 years old. She did finally outgrow it.

          Like the others have said, I would calmly pull her off the bed and not yell at her. That is what I had to do with Tia. I could not excite her at all in the house or else she would pee. She finally outgrew it around a year old. There is hope! Don't give up!
          ~Amy~

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          • #6
            thank you for the replies! i'm so glad i'm not the only one. i have no problem with her on the bed it's just, she's ruined three of my comforters and i'm getting tired of spending the money on it! we did all of her training in a good sweet loving voice and that worked, but i don't even have to scold her for her to pee i'll just give her the off motion and say "off" in a normal speaking tone and she pees... she gets on the bed TO pee... it's like it's her favorite potty spot or something. she knows the command "go potty" and does it on command, she just doesn't get WHERE to pee. i have tried the treat thing and she understands what "off" means but she'll get on the bed when i'm LAYING THERE squat and pee... i just don't understand. thank you for the hope that she'll grow out of it though! i think the breeder we got her from had a guy there that didn't treat her so well because she was VERY male shy and has bonded to me way more than my boyfriend who lives with us. she has warmed up to him, but new males she still worries about... i don't know. but thank you all the same!
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            • #7
              Some time's you just get a dog that get's nervous and pee's. I had this with my smaller dog's. Will your pup pee if some one comes in the house and walk's over to greet her and then she will pee? I know this is a long shot but have you had her urine tested to see if maybe she has a urine infection? About the comforter if she likes going on the bed could you put another top layer on the comforter so this way when she pee's she will damage the good one. Good luck she is a sweetie!!!
              Asiasigpic

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              • #8
                no she doesn't pee when she meets other people it's only when van, my boyfriend, and i scold her or tell her not to do something she knew she wasn't supposed to do in the first place. it always happens when she KNOWS she shouldn't be doing it but does it anyway...
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                • #9
                  Originally posted by AllyCakes View Post
                  Whenever you get too harsh to her like speaking in a stern voice she cowers and pees...
                  Originally posted by AllyCakes View Post
                  i don't even have to scold her for her to pee i'll just give her the off motion and say "off" in a normal speaking tone and she pees...
                  Originally posted by AllyCakes View Post
                  it's only when van, my boyfriend, and i scold her or tell her not to do something
                  You're answering your own question. You just don't want to admit it

                  By scolding her and being harsh, you have created this. Don't blame the dog. She's not doing it because she KNOWS she's not supposed to be doing something and does it anyway. She's doing it because for her its the ultimate sign of submission, and she feels the need to submit to you. YOU created that. Not her.

                  Show her that you understand her communications to you and communicate clearly to her (by teaching her off), and this will eventually go away on its own. Management is keeping her out of your bedroom.
                  Until one has loved an animal, part of one's soul remains unawakened.
                  - Anatole France

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by AllyCakes View Post
                    . it always happens when she KNOWS she shouldn't be doing it but does it anyway...
                    Clearly she does NOT KNOW or it would not be an issue. Your dog sounds nervous because you and the boyfriend are not predictable. I'm willing to bet one or both of you allow her on the bed sometimes to cuddle and then yell when she is up there alone. Your post screams little to no training has been done with this dog, inconsistancy in human interaction, and a dog that is not comfortable with her owners beacuse of it.

                    Submissive/nervous peeing is a big red flag that you need to get a professional trainer and learn how to teach your dog what you expect of her insted of running around yelling at her for things she "knows" she should not do.

                    Good dogs arn't born, they are made by dedicated owners. Hire a trainer before she goes full into her teen years and she shows you everything she "knows" is wrong.
                    sigpic
                    "Show me your dog, and I will tell you what manner of man you are."
                    ~Capt. Max von Stephanitz
                    Anubis CGC (RIP) , Cheza CGC, Schwarz Frost von Lichtefeld CGCA THD TDIA, Steele Gunner Goatsbane CGCA, and Professional House Dog Oliver.

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                    • #11
                      i appreciate your support guys, or lack there of. i'm not trying to blame ally for peeing that's why i wanted to talk to you guys. i KNOW that it's my fault that she has issues i was just wondering how to fix it. i'm sorry if i came off irresponsible or inconsistent, she probably thinks we're inconsistent because she used to be allowed on the bed then she started peeing on it all of the time so now when we tell her off she just pees. i am NOT yelling at her. i don't YELL at my dog, because HAVE YOU SEEN HER FLIPPIN FACE???? IT'S THE CUTEST THING EVER HOW COULD I?!?!
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                      • #12
                        Sometimes "support" includes telling you things you may not want to hear.

                        How are you going to stop the submissive peeing if you don't fully understand what's causing it?

                        You don't have to yell, you yourself said she only does this when you speak to her harshly. May not be a yell to you but it obviously is to her as she feels the need to show you how very sorry she is you're upset by PEEING.
                        That's what I don't think you're understanding, she is peeing to appease you - NOT because she knows she wrong, but because you're acting like an unpredictable, dangerous person (in her mind) and she is saying to you "see? I am no threat whatsoever, I pee in your presence"
                        OR she could be an excited pee-er and your raised emotions around the bed or asking her to get of please before you ruin another comforter is getting her hyped up enough to let loose. LOTS of puppies are excited pee-ers.

                        The key though is to remain completely unfazed and neutral about the whole thing, even as you see the lake forming on your bed - again. This really is a behavior you have to ignore completely to get it to go away.
                        Until one has loved an animal, part of one's soul remains unawakened.
                        - Anatole France

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                        • #13
                          Hi,

                          There was the suggestion to gate her from the bedroom as part of the solution, I would try that as a start. Clean your bed up, maybe using an enzymatic cleaner of some sort to get rid of the smell of pee. Take away her ability to pee on your bed and work on her Off command in other settings until she does it reliably.
                          If she pees during these training sessions (work outside if you have to or on a floor that's easily cleaned), tone down your approach and voice, be neutral/matter of fact and quiet, even with your praise.
                          Up the excitement level bits at a time until she's not peeing when you ask something of her. Work your way into the bedroom, move back out if she pees on the bed. But until she "gets it" she shouldn't be allowed in your room, however long it takes.
                          My puppy began counter surfing once she got big enough to reach, although she won't get in our faces while we eat and try to steal food, once she learned she could find good things in there she didn't want to stop.
                          I tried catching her in the act and pulling her off the counter saying NO, taking her out of the kitchen, didn't work. I gated off the kitchen, she was taught "out of the Kitchen", and "stay" for times she may have wandered in if the gate was open. Now after 4 months she will sit outside the gate and wait to be allowed in, I'm working on teaching her not to even sniff the counters.
                          Baby steps at a time, but in the mean time she can't get at the kitchen to fail. She can stay in there when I'm in there if she lays down while I work.
                          I hope you try the suggestions that were given, and also try not to feel ganged up on. The suggestions you got are good ones (not saying mine are the way to go, just how I would do it if it were me).

                          Take care, and I hope you get this worked out soon, I know it's frustrating!

                          Dawne

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                          • #14
                            I have a Dane that fear pees too. We got Kevin at 6 months old and he would fear pee at garbage bags, loud noises, when Odin barked, and especially when he was in his crate. I took a week off work (puppyternity!) and we spent most of that week just hanging out together in his crate until he realized it was a good place. When we need to tell him no, we make sure we do it in a non-threatening way and redirect him quickly so he doesn't have a chance to get upset. As for his fear of bags, I let him watch Odin and I play with one, he got rewarded for coming towards the scary bag, then he got rewarded for sniffing it, and now he's realized that they're really not a big deal and he could care less when I change the garbage.

                            I think the most important thing you can do is be patient. It does take time but it's worth all the effort. I also agree with gating off the bedroom until you have a reliable "off." Others have had some really good suggestions, I hope you give them a try. I just wanted to let you know that you're not alone and that with some work, it does get better!

                            Kim
                            The best things in life are rescued.

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                            • #15
                              ally is no longer allowed on the bed and now when i'm in the shower, which was usually when she would get on it, she is in the kennel or i wait for Van to get home so he can watch her. we've been working on "off" with things that she was always allowed on like the couch. now she gets off when we walk over and when we say off we don't even change any sound in our voice. we have also added a very strict potty schedule that's posted on the fridge so we both have to stick to it. i feel like the schedule allows her to know that she WILL go out every two hours even if she doesn't have to go. at night she's in the kennel (which she loves when you add her favorite blanket and bone) and we wake her up in the morning when we're ready to get up instead of when she is.

                              Thank you for your advice and i'm hoping this will work.
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