Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Life stages - babies to adulthood

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Life stages - babies to adulthood

    DANE PUPS: GROWTH STAGES.
    Pups are born with their eyes & ears sealed and they open & start to walk around 2 weeks. Bt 1 month they can begin to be weaned & by two months they are usually ready to go home with their new family. At 2-3 mo. pups are still very much babies & cannot "hold it" for more than a couple of hours, need to be fed 3-4 times a day. The are still adjusting to being away from their litter, so be patient with them, & recognize they'll soon gain a little more control. By four months they should have had their shots, be ready to join a puppy class, get to go out regularly & start their rapid growth period where Dane owners must guard the pups from over-eating & from innapropriate exercise (wild running, stairs, jumping & other activities that will very likely end in injuries). Training should begin in earnest as a Dane pup will be over 80 lbs. by 6 mo., so NOW is the time to teach him the basics. AS they grow towards their first birthday, they should be kept skinny enough to have your neighbors comment you are not feeding them enough. They should go new places each week & learn to accept your leadership & direction. Practice your obedience skills everyday. Remember this is an age where pups put everything in their mouths, so watch for chewing and expect some bouts of diarrhea. This is also a stage where injuries can cause permanent damage, so make sure to keep your pup fit with regular, but not really strenuous, exercise. It is a good time to get your pet spayed/neutered--the sooner the better (& cheaper). By nine months most dane females will be experiencing their first heat & most males will begin to get a huge adolescent rush of testosterone & their adolescence usually means new behavioural problems crop up (which can be lessened by getting rid of the hormonal influence). Expect them to go thru a "shy" period--a "2d fear imprint" period (the first is around 8-10 wks. when a pup first ventures away from his litter-the 2nd is when he starts to venture away from his pack& to think of himself as a potential adult). Make sure you continue insisting on good & friendly behaviour. By the time a pup is a year they have most of their adult height & probably 2/3 of their adult weight. By 4-6 mo. a pup should be eating two meals--by 6 mo. about 6 cups is typical. By the time a Dane pup reaches 18 mo. s/he is growing into their adult ways & by the time they are 2 years they will be near their adult weight & looks (some males may take to 3 years to achieve their full bloom). This is where all your hard work will begin to pay off! Then you should have (hopefully)nearly a decade with a charming companion who is well grown & well behaved. By the time Danes are 8 or so they will begin to show their age (some as soon as 6). (Grey in the face happens as eary as 2-3 & isn't a sign of age really.) They will slow down a bit & be more of a homebody than ever. Their health really needs to be monitored and a "geriatric profile" & examination by your vet may help catch any health problems early on. Enjoy your Dane & recongize a lot of what you're going thru is their typical "age & stage."Know what is normal, so that you can recognize problems when they occur & know otherwise to be knd, firm & patient.


  • #2
    RE: Life stages - babies to adulthood

    How long is does the "2d fear imprint" stage last. Millies continues to be very shy around adults she does not know despite the fact that we take her everywhere to keep her socialized.


    Comment


    • #3
      RE: Life stages - babies to adulthood

      Molly--if it last more than a few weeks then it's not aphase or stage, it's more likely a habit and part of the basic personality. A "2d fear imprint" is when a normally happy-go-lucky pup is *all of the sudden* & totally uncharacteristically shy when you don't expect it & it's really a shock. A dog who is basically shy is one who has a habit you may not like, but you *do* anticipate the problem (when you see a stange man, a big dog, etc.). Dogs who are shy and fearful need a lot of training as well as a lot of socialization to help them gain the confidence they lack. regards/jpy


      Comment


      • #4
        RE: Life stages - babies to adulthood

        Millie has always been shy of adults, even though we have been taking her out in public to socialize her since we got her at three months. In most cases she will only approach someone if they are not looking directly at her, exception to that is children whom she is very social with. Many times someone will approach and she will try to hid behind me, only after the person starts to walk away will she take interest. Other times like at the park if someone stops to ask me a question she will stand to my side as if making sure she has an escape route and always looking to see if someone or something is coming at her from behind. Somewhat confused as to why she is so shy around adults when she was raised by a young woman in her twenties who lived with her partents. Even though the daughter was the main care taker of the dogs both parents took an active role in helping to raise the puppies, this coming from the conversations we had and the stories they told. I guess at this point it is a learned habit and will probably take a while to get her completely comfortable.


        Comment


        • #5
          RE: Life stages - babies to adulthood

          Molly_ I frankly doubt from your (very clear!) description this is a learned trait or a phase that Millie will ever really grow out of. This sounds like her basic personality & you can (& should)certainly work to make her more confident, but you'll likely have to accept she'll never really be a gregarious dog & will always feel a bit uneasy in a crowd, & just control for that. About 50% of a dog's personality in inherited temperament. You can adapt this temperament around a range of personality, but you cannot really change their basic makeup, as much of who they will be is really somewhat set in stone long before the would-be puppy purchaser arrives on the scene. regards/jpy


          Comment

          Working...
          X