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Understanding the balance (75%/20%/5%)?

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  • Understanding the balance (75%/20%/5%)?

    So i switched my pooch over to a raw diet a week ago, starting, as advised with one meat while he gets used to it (chicken was my meat of choice) so he has been having chicken quarters, thighs and drumsticks which he has loved, I've put a bit of organic coconut oil and natural yoghurt in the mix to help with his 'outdoor activities' and now he seems really settled.

    After a week of chicken I figured it's time to mix things up a little. So I ventured out to my local butcher and it turns out they make their very own raw dog food mix, consisting of chicken, mince, seasonal meats and some organ, they basically pack it all together and freeze it and sell it for 1 ($1.40) for 3lbs.

    Frank [I]loved[/I this stuff, I was suprised at how much he loved it, but obviously it had no bone in there so i threw in a couple of chicken quarters for good measure.

    Now I've read that the correct ratio should (roughly) be:

    75% meat (chicken, mince, lamb, etc)
    5% organ (heart, lover etc)
    20% bone

    I just wanted to make sure that the general consensus agreed with this, and that I'm not missing out anything essential. I also always include coconut oil, yogurt and maybe a bit of olive oil in the mix just for a bit of variety. On the odd day I've bunged in a bit of cooked sweet potato too or raw pumpkin.

    The last thing I want to do is cause some sort of deficiency in his diet and make him worse off than before, so I just need someone to give me some guidance that I'm along the right lines, because researching raw feeding is literally a minefield of information.

    Thanks in advanced.

  • #2
    That sounds o.k. to me. They do need some bone. If you can find spareribs at a good price that's a good meat to feed. The bones are soft and they can consume all of it. Pork neck bones, the same. Just mix it up for a wide variety as possible.

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    • #3
      You should check if they add bone meal or ground bone. We mainly do a pre-made mix like that, and ours has the organ and bone already added.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by jrturk View Post
        You should check if they add bone meal or ground bone. We mainly do a pre-made mix like that, and ours has the organ and bone already added.
        I asked them and they said they don't put any bone in as it won't process through the grinder they use for making it, but I'm going getting some today so I'll check.

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        • #5
          20% bone is okay at the beginning, but it will be too high as your dog adjusts to raw. My dogs now need very little bone--they get chicken quarters once or twice a week and maybe a couple of deer ribs (which they consume completely). If I tried to feed them more, they'd be constipated horribly. All you need to do, is watch the poo if it's consistently hard, white, and crumbly coming out, you should feed less bone.

          I think a premix is okay, but I'd rather know exactly what my dog is eating, and non-regulated pre-mixes make me suspicious. I have one pre-mix available to me which has a guaranteed nutritional analysis and it's the only one I will feed. It's okay to have some on hand for quick easy feeding, but mostly I feed real, whole meats. Bigger pieces and bone they have to chew are better for the teeth anyway.

          The balance will come into the diet through the organ you feed. You should feed at least liver (mostly), kidney, and spleen. Heart is a muscle, NOT AN ORGAN, when it comes to a raw diet. Lung is also not an organ, feed it as meat (although my dogs don't care much for it...). The brain is an organ. Basically, the really oogie things are organs that contain the special nutrients your dog needs.

          You can throw in the extra things like you already do for variety. Coconut oil is great for them. You should look into wild caught salmon oil, too, for the Omega 3s.
          Tracy
          sigpic
          Mouse April 2010
          Echo -- run free, Sweetie! Jan 9, 2007 - April 24, 2014 Lost to osteosarcoma at 7 years, 3 months. RIP.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by mnmouse View Post
            20% bone is okay at the beginning, but it will be too high as your dog adjusts to raw. My dogs now need very little bone--they get chicken quarters once or twice a week and maybe a couple of deer ribs (which they consume completely). If I tried to feed them more, they'd be constipated horribly. All you need to do, is watch the poo if it's consistently hard, white, and crumbly coming out, you should feed less bone.

            I think a premix is okay, but I'd rather know exactly what my dog is eating, and non-regulated pre-mixes make me suspicious. I have one pre-mix available to me which has a guaranteed nutritional analysis and it's the only one I will feed. It's okay to have some on hand for quick easy feeding, but mostly I feed real, whole meats. Bigger pieces and bone they have to chew are better for the teeth anyway.

            The balance will come into the diet through the organ you feed. You should feed at least liver (mostly), kidney, and spleen. Heart is a muscle, NOT AN ORGAN, when it comes to a raw diet. Lung is also not an organ, feed it as meat (although my dogs don't care much for it...). The brain is an organ. Basically, the really oogie things are organs that contain the special nutrients your dog needs.

            You can throw in the extra things like you already do for variety. Coconut oil is great for them. You should look into wild caught salmon oil, too, for the Omega 3s.
            100% this. Fergus was raw fed for awhile, and we had to start out with a pretty high bone content, but after a bit we greatly decreased it. Just watch his poop. If it's runny, add more, if it's white and powdery and hard, feed less. I did normally feed bones with organs, because inevitably organs caused Ferg to have loose poops. Most pork bones are good (he liked ribs, and would tolerate neck bones), and all poultry bones- just with poultry stuff there are some smaller pieces you have to watch out for. Necks, small wings, etc. You can either feed those attached to a bigger piece of meat or freeze several together in a big clump. I also had to feed organs frozen. He ate them better and they are just less nasty that way.

            If they can tell you exactly what's in the raw mix, I suppose it's okay, but I'm with Mouse on this one. I'd much rather know for certain what's in there, and I preferred feeding whole cuts of meat anyway. Ferg always inhaled ground stuff. I would think it's more satisfying to actually chew your food lol.
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            Fergus
            SC Dinnie Stone Guardian, CGC
            Eisen Shark
            C Shadows On The Sun, CGC

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            • #7
              all together, i have had 5 danes on raw (2 presently). i guess mine are a bit unusual in that they get bone with every meal (chicken, pork neck, turkey). i scout poop every day (actually, watch them) and i have yet to see any problem with constipation and/or powdery poop. i rarely feed a boneless meal, i can count the times on one hand.
              [SIGPIC]

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              • #8
                I think it's just what they get used to, mostly. I feed bone once or twice a week, maybe three times. More than that and Mouse is crab walking, trying to poo. I'd rather feed more meat anyway--it's easier for me to get, and cheaper, but that's just because I get a lot of my meat for free from my freezer clean out ads on craigslist, and that's usually boneless.
                Tracy
                sigpic
                Mouse April 2010
                Echo -- run free, Sweetie! Jan 9, 2007 - April 24, 2014 Lost to osteosarcoma at 7 years, 3 months. RIP.

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                • #9
                  I think it depends on the dog. I feed something bone in most days, but it's usually something like a leg quarter or pork riblets plus something boneless, so they get around 10-15% bone. My friend has a standard poodle that needs more like 20% bone daily or he gets loose poops. The standard ratio I've heard is 80/10/10, but you just watch the poop and adjust as needed. I'm also not th biggest fan of premade raw mixes. I want to know exactly what I'm feeding. It's also not great for their teeth. I feed some Blue Ridge Beef products which are ground, but I usually feed my ground stuff frozen and the rest whole meats. They get cleaner teeth plus a jaw workout and mental stimulation from having to rip, tear, and chew their food. Ground stuff just gets inhaled in 2 seconds.
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                  Chaucey
                  Asaah ~ xxx Asaah LaLa, CGC, registered therapy dog

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                  • #10
                    I'm with oshagcj14...RAW with bones is the way to go. I get the Blue Ridge tripe and sometimes a couple other "flavors" for toppers but meals always consist of whole cuts of meat.

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                    • #11
                      I also use whole cuts for the dogs, but I do give the cat ground, but I also give him chicken drums and thighs with most of the meat cut off and he has to chew it off the bone for a dental workout. I get the ground from my coop and she grinds it herself so I know exactly what is in it. But the dogs would gulp ground in 2 seconds flat, even frozen they get through it really quick.

                      Don't forget, you aren't just feeding for nutrition, you also want those shiny white teeth to stay healthy.
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