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A Purebred is Different

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  • A Purebred is Different

    I think we all understand the basics of why a purebred is different than the canine species in general, but I think too, that the point that they are different is lost on many.

    Purebreds are the results of genetic scientific experimentation. Dogs were bred together to produce specific desirable traits and after a period of time become there own distinct breed. Purebreds are not created through evolution, or through any means of divine creationism. They are a product of human manipulation. Nowhere in history have these breeds evolved naturally, nor were they born unto this world as such. This means that if any person breeds and deviates from the set formula of the breed, then genetically, the result is no longer that of the breed. It is very easy to mess up this genetic lineage, as we see with BYBs constantly.

    This is one reason showing and health testing are so important. even the slightest deviation from proper breeding techniques can have a huge impact on the breed, both on their conformation, and their health. Purebred breeding is a science, not a natural occurrence.

    I felt this was an important fact to touch upon. It seems so obvious, but often the most obvious points are the easiest to miss
    sigpic A dog has the soul of a philosopher ~ Plato

  • #2
    That's a clear way of putting it. I will have to remember that when folks ask if I plan to breed Duke
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    Deb

    Duke and Ivy

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    • #3
      Originally posted by isa aldawolfa View Post
      I think we all understand the basics of why a purebred is different than the canine species in general, but I think too, that the point that they are different is lost on many.

      Purebreds are the results of genetic scientific experimentation. Dogs were bred together to produce specific desirable traits and after a period of time become there own distinct breed. Purebreds are not created through evolution, or through any means of divine creationism. They are a product of human manipulation. Nowhere in history have these breeds evolved naturally, nor were they born unto this world as such. This means that if any person breeds and deviates from the set formula of the breed, then genetically, the result is no longer that of the breed. It is very easy to mess up this genetic lineage, as we see with BYBs constantly.

      This is one reason showing and health testing are so important. even the slightest deviation from proper breeding techniques can have a huge impact on the breed, both on their conformation, and their health. Purebred breeding is a science, not a natural occurrence.

      I felt this was an important fact to touch upon. It seems so obvious, but often the most obvious points are the easiest to miss
      Well said .

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      • #4
        Still listening and learning over here.

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        • #5
          Perfectly said!
          My Blog: My Fur-Real Life

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          *Jennifer*
          Wife to John, Mom to McKayla and Chris
          Owned by Katie and Rio

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Dickie Best View Post
            Still listening and learning over here.
            LOL.. as we all should be!
            sigpic A dog has the soul of a philosopher ~ Plato

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            • #7
              Originally posted by isa aldawolfa View Post
              I think we all understand the basics of why a purebred is different than the canine species in general, but I think too, that the point that they are different is lost on many.

              Purebreds are the results of genetic scientific experimentation. Dogs were bred together to produce specific desirable traits and after a period of time become there own distinct breed. Purebreds are not created through evolution, or through any means of divine creationism. They are a product of human manipulation. Nowhere in history have these breeds evolved naturally, nor were they born unto this world as such. This means that if any person breeds and deviates from the set formula of the breed, then genetically, the result is no longer that of the breed. It is very easy to mess up this genetic lineage, as we see with BYBs constantly.

              This is one reason showing and health testing are so important. even the slightest deviation from proper breeding techniques can have a huge impact on the breed, both on their conformation, and their health. Purebred breeding is a science, not a natural occurrence.

              I felt this was an important fact to touch upon. It seems so obvious, but often the most obvious points are the easiest to miss
              Nicely said - unfortunately the same arguement is also used to justify new "designer mixes" as breeds. The idea that if people created purebreeds by using a variety of other breeds & selecting progeny to create a stable breed - then who say people cannot or should not do the same today?

              But to add to the point you made - it takes a long time for breeders to come close to the ideal - and a very short time to take that progeny & destroy all of the progress made.
              Last edited by my3bbdanes; 03-27-2011, 02:17 PM. Reason: typo
              sigpicNikol Marsh & Glory, Emma, Tycho & Bronte
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              Int CH Blue Moon's For Game and Glory, CGC, TDI
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              • #8
                there are differences between 'designer dogs' and new, up and coming breeds IMO. the AKC accepts a few new breeds each year. I'm talking about shnauser doodles, or great dane doodles, but legit. established breeds with a registry, a breed standard, etc.

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                • #9
                  Well said. Examples to back up your statements:
                  The GSD-the most versitile working dog ever is now riddled with health and temperment issues
                  The Golden Retriever-the ultimate family dog but most die of some type of cancer way too young
                  The Bulldog-can't be born without a c-section and most have breathing issues
                  The Pitbull-once a family dog and mascot, now the most feared breed

                  All this screwing up of breeds has only taken 20-40 years, if that. Yet another reason to only support ethical breeders!
                  sigpicIs it dinnertime yet?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by maggiemay98 View Post
                    Well said. Examples to back up your statements:
                    The GSD-the most versitile working dog ever is now riddled with health and temperment issues
                    The Golden Retriever-the ultimate family dog but most die of some type of cancer way too young
                    The Bulldog-can't be born without a c-section and most have breathing issues
                    The Pitbull-once a family dog and mascot, now the most feared breed

                    All this screwing up of breeds has only taken 20-40 years, if that. Yet another reason to only support ethical breeders!
                    ...but the examples u gave with the bulldog and gsd were created by show folks, the very people who r supposed to be the 'ethical breeders'.
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                    Still looks frozen to me.....

                    We didn't do it It was the cats...

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by autumnroyal View Post
                      ...but the examples u gave with the bulldog and gsd were created by show folks, the very people who r supposed to be the 'ethical breeders'.

                      I was going to say the exact same thing with the only exception in that list is the PB which is the result of bad press.

                      What I am not understanding is that BYB definitely overwhelms the breeding landscape and two of my residence dogs are rescues with their lineage not known and I don't see them far away from the standard in structure and in temperament. Of course these dogs are culled, meaning they are S/N so whatever minor flaw is in the heritage it will not be carried on.

                      Also, if purebred breeding is a science, how come it is left in the hands of mostly hobbiest, shouldn't someone achieve some kind of formal credentials before attempting to breed?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by autumnroyal View Post
                        ...but the examples u gave with the bulldog and gsd were created by show folks, the very people who r supposed to be the 'ethical breeders'.
                        Maybe "ethical breeding" has to be re-theorized to include a greater emphasis on health and welfare, and maybe the idea of "breed" should be considered as something that must evolve continually, and not necessarily uni-directionally, in order to approach the ideal?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by DPU View Post
                          Also, if purebred breeding is a science, how come it is left in the hands of mostly hobbiest, shouldn't someone achieve some kind of formal credentials before attempting to breed?
                          In an attempt to contextualize your question: When dog breeding emerged as a hobby (out of animal husbandry and hunting culture) in the mid-19th century, it was a popular hobby of people we would nowadays call "scientists" (like Charles Darwin); in fact, what we would think of now as scientific practice was at that point mostly in the hands of hobbyists. So it may be helpful to think of dog breeding as a scientific hobby.

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                          • #14
                            I am new to gd's and dog ownwership in general, so I have lots to learn.

                            Even when talking to the breeder about gd's before buying my pup I didn't get why she was putting such emphasis on her dogs showing history.

                            Why is showing is such a factor?

                            Also, I have been asked numerous times now where I got my pup from...strangers and friends both...and then get poked fun of for spending so much $$$ on a registered, purebred dog. So I explain about their health and tempermant and how that's dependant upon responsible breeding and care. Mostly people smirk like I've fallen for some kind of hype. How do you respond to that?

                            Thanks!

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                            • #15
                              Showing is but one piece of the breeding puzzle...by showing it gets a breeders dogs out and gets them evaluated by judges and yes even their peers...it is a way of determining if their dogs meet breed standard, it is a way to get their dogs out & seem.

                              Health testing (not simple vet exams) is another important piece...while not the end all it does give the breeder an opportunity to see if the dog being considered has hip dysplasia, heart or thyroid issues, eye issues..it shows that the breeder has enough of an interest in teh well being of the breed to try to produce the healthiest puppies possible. While health testign doesn't eliminate the risk it does reduce it.

                              Temperament yet another important piece...a good temperament is a must,It is something a good breeder takes seriosuly and will do what ever they humanly can to make sure they produce puppies with sound temperaments.

                              Longevity...another piece...breeders have worked diligently and hard to improve the life span of the Dane. A well bred Dane who has received proper care can and often does live into their teens.

                              A good breeder breeds for all pieces of the puzzle not just one or two.
                              When you buy from a good breeder you are paying for all the hard work & dedication, the care, the research, the nurturing that has gone into producing the best puppy possible.
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                              Dale AKC CGC Evaluator
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