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  • #16
    RE: THIS INFO SAVED MY DOG'S LIFE!!!!

    The vet tacked her stomach, so I don't have to worry about her bloating ever again.

    I'm glad this info was able to help you out.Please be aware tho, that tacking will help prevent your dog from torsioning, not from bloating.

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    In Memory of Sky, EZ and Honor

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    Well behaved danes are not born. They are “made” by responsible and caring dane owners.

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    • #17
      RE: THIS INFO SAVED MY DOG'S LIFE!!!!

      Dolmod, what's the difference? I'd really like to know, since the vet said they tack their stomachs a lot of times when they go in to spay, to help prevent it.

      I know that it'll keep the stomach from twisting again, but I thought that's what caused the bloat?

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      • #18
        RE: THIS INFO SAVED MY DOG'S LIFE!!!!

        Bloat describes a stomach which has become abnormally enlarged or distended. The stomach is filled with gas, food, liquid, or a combination thereof. Torsion is the abnormal positioning of the stomach which is caused by the stomach's rotation about its axis, i.e. twisting of the stomach. Bloat usually leads to torsion, although torsion can occur without bloat.
        sigpic
        In Memory of Sky, EZ and Honor

        Visit Poke's Facebook Page

        Member of the GDC of MD.
        Well behaved danes are not born. They are “made” by responsible and caring dane owners.

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        • #19
          RE: THIS INFO SAVED MY DOG'S LIFE!!!!

          Yep, read up on it after I got your message. Thanks for the info.

          So now that Lexi's had bloat, and at such an early age (2), the consensus is that it might be genetic, so I need to take steps to make sure she doesn't get it again.

          What the vet did was tack her stomach to her ribcage so she won't get torsion again, but that doesn't guarantee against bloat.

          Lexi is now on small, moist meals several times a day, and I'm going to continue that for the remainder of her life. I'll also make sure that she doesn't drink or exercise heavily before or after she eats.

          I imagine with good care, and the fact that I know what to look for, I should be able to keep the odds down of her getting it again.


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          • #20
            RE: Bloat Checklist-References and Information

            Hello everyone... We just started browsing this site and was really surprised (or disturbed) as to the amount of danes that have bloat or torsion. We have two danes that are 2 1/2 and 1 1/2 , we have had them from birth but this is the first time either of us have owned them. My husband used to be involved in rottweiler rescue and is more familiar with large dogs than I am, but for some reason I was under the impression that bloat happens mostly in pups. I see now that I was wrong on that. We have found that our dogs maintain weight better and thrive better now that we leave food out to "graze" on at will.. They never eat a lot at one time... Where as when we were feeding them 3 times a day they would scarf it all down quickly. Should we not be doind the grazing thing? Just wanted some opinions...

            thanks

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            • #21
              RE: Bloat Checklist-References and Information

              Lexi was what you'd call a "grazer". Had dry food available at all times, day and night. I would also give her canned food once a day.

              She seemed to do okay on it, until 3 weeks ago, which is when she bloated w/torsion. She just turned 2 y/o on 10/07/05.

              The thing to remember is that your dogs should not have food or water available to them right before or after they've exercised.

              The rule of thumb with Lexi now is no water/food before she goes out, and if she runs around like a nut, as is usual for her, she gets nothing to drink or eat for at least an hour. I do bend the rules if she's extremely hot and let her have a gulp or two of water, but no more than that for at least an hour, sometimes two.

              I've encountered a few problems with not letting Lexi have free choice with food, but that's just the way it goes now. All her food is soft, and she gets fed twice a day. No more kibble, although she does still get crunchy treats once in awhile. And she's also on a gas reliever, which seems to help.

              However, nothing is a cure-all, and once your dog has had bloat, they're more susceptible to it. Lexi was very uncomfortable last night, and I could tell it was because of her stomach. Made for a very long night for me, because I sat with her head in my lap until 2:30 a.m., when she started feeling herself again.

              I'm just glad I'm not a breeder because I'd never breed her now, knowing what might be in store for the puppies. Her littermate died in November from heart complications, and with Lexi's bloat, there's no way I'd want those defects passed on to future generations.

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              • #22
                RE: Bloat Checklist-References and Information

                Thanks Lexis mom.. Since I read this sight I have been paranoid about the bloat thing. The thing with our dogs is that they stay outside except in the evenings when I get home. Not sure if I should change to two feedings instead of grazing.. We used to do that and they would scarf the food down so quickly its like they could not breathe and that was with me feeding them three times a day.... Now I watch them and they dont eat but a little each time. I guess there is no way to be sure, just to watch them closely...huh? Is bloat something that they are more apt to get if their ancestors suffered?

                P.S. By the way I have a daughter named Lexi...

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                • #23
                  RE: Bloat Checklist-References and Information

                  Hi Courtney, very cool that you have a daughter named Lexi!

                  Actually, Lexi's "real" AKC registered name is RDK Grand Duchess Alexia, but I shortened it. Lexi thinks her actual name is Dammit-Lexi-No! :9

                  The problem with bloat is that the health professionals don't really know what the factors are that cause it. They think genetics play a part, but neither of Lexi's parents were prone to it, nor her paternal grandparents. I don't know about her maternal grandparents, since they belonged to someone other than the breeder I got Lexi from.

                  I know about the bolting food problem since Lexi does it now, but there's not a lot I can do about it. She's not allowed a dry, hard food any longer, and I feel I need to be there to supervise her when she eats.

                  I don't know what kind of dry food you're feeding, but you might want to water test it. Take some of the dry food and place it in a bowl. Pour water over it, covering the food. Wait 25-30 minutes, and see how much water your kibble has soaked up. If there's no water left, and your kibble has expanded a lot, you've got bloat waiting to happen with your guys. If it'll expand in water like that, it's going to expand in your dogs' stomachs like that too, when they drink. And the fact that your dogs are outside, able to romp around all day, you add another problem to the equation.

                  I'm not saying that your dogs are going to bloat, but you have several factors there against your favor. Deep chested breeds like the Dane are prone to bloat, and with heavy exercise, then immediately eating and gulping down water, you've got the makings of a disaster on your hands.

                  And if your animals DO bloat, you have a finite time to get them to the vet's before they can't be helped. Thank God I was home when Lexi started to bloat, because I knew in a matter of minutes what it was, and had her in the car and to the vet's within the hour. Not all cases can be saved of course, but time is of the essence with this horrible condition. If you're at work when it happens, it might be too late by the time you get home.

                  Since Lexi had torsion (stomach twist) with bloat, she had no way to relieve the pressure, which would have killed her without surgery. The surgeon did a gastropexy, and said that at least she won't torsion should she bloat again. Not too comforting though, since even bloat without torsion can kill them in extreme cases.

                  I'm not trying to tell you what to do, but from my own emotionally painful and financially costly position as someone whose dog has gone through it, I would recommend that you take away as many possible causes as you can.

                  Danes are very special dogs and I'll always have one, but from now on I'm going to be uber sensitive to the potential dangers for bloat, and eliminate them wherever I can.

                  I'd hate to think that anyone else's dog has to go through what Lexi did. It's painful, scary, and they go downhill so fast it's terrifying.

                  Sorry, didn't mean to write a book. I hope I gave you some good info.

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                  • #24
                    RE: Bloat Checklist-References and Information

                    Thanks again. All your information is something to think about. I appreciate you taking the time to fill me in on all that. I will try the dog food test for sure.

                    You've been a great help!!!

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                    • #25
                      RE: Bloat Checklist-References and Information

                      Thanx for the informative list but I Live in a hot humid country (India) and my danes here drink a lot of water esp when fed dried food.
                      In this case what should I do?
                      My danes have attained the height of over 42 inches (at withers) and are perfectly healthy though one died due to bloat.
                      Please pin point the signs of bloat.
                      navedzahir@yahoo.co.in

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                      • #26
                        RE: Bloat Checklist-References and Information

                        That list ARE the signs of bloat. Can't pinpoint them any better than that.

                        Just drinking excessive amounts of water when they're hot doesn't constitute bloat. Read the signs over more carefully, and if you know your dogs as well I know mine, you should be able to spot abnormal behaviour immediately.

                        If you've already had one die from bloat, you should have received tips from your vet on how to try to prevent it from happening again. Or did you just have a dog die and assume it was bloat, without actually taking them to a vet?

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                        • #27
                          RE: Bloat Checklist-References and Information

                          Yes, I am also alarmed at how many danes here are getting bloat. This is our second dane (lost the first to Wobblers Syndrome), and although some people may be squeamish about this diet option, our vet swears by it, and some of the local dane rescue folk recommend it, and I did notice many positive differences while using it for our dane. One of the main reasons I agreed to it is because, apparently, virtually no dogs on this diet ever get bloat. There is information on the raw food diet, here http://www.rawlearning.com/ and dane-specifics regarding the diet here http://experts.about.com/q/Great-Dan...-food-diet.htm
                          Kymythy Schultz has a good book out, ULTIMATE DIET: NATURAL NUTRITION FOR DOGS AND CATS.

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                          • #28
                            RE: Bloat Checklist-References and Information

                            I'd just like to add that I give my dog Nzymes which is a product that helps aid in the digestion of food and helps a dog have a healthy good bactieria count. One of the items that seem to have been found to contribute to bloat is not having a good balance in the stomach which leads to digestion problems.

                            I did lose a Dane to Bloat and Torsion and I'd like to add that having a complete plan if the emergency happens is extremely important. When I was choosing a vet/animal hospital for my puppy I had asked the question if they were experienced in emergency surgery for bloat and torsion. They said yes, I didn't know I had to ask at what times of the day! When my dog bloated I recongnized it as his stomach was huge. I immediately called my Vet/hospital and was told to bring him in (the time was 6:15pm). I took him there, they brought him in back, I sat and waited, the Vet came out told me yes he is bloating but, he could not do the surgery because there would be no one there overnight to take care of him and they proceeded to tell me instructions on how to get to the nearest overnight emergecy vet, which was another 25min away (they were so calm about it I felt like he had time) I had to walk this poor dog back outside and put him back in the car and drive in the dark to a place I was totaly unfamiliar with which took more alot more time. There the Vet said his insides were too far gone and he needed to be put down. The sad thing is, I knew of another 24hr vet in the other direction of my house I couldv'e been there in 20-25min. My Vet at the time was 10-15min away and when they told me to bring him in I thought that meant they were prepared to do the surgery. (silly me). You think they would have told me on the phone we can't do the surgery at this time of the evening you need to take him to a 24hr place. so much precious time was waisted.

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                            • #29
                              RE: Bloat Checklist-References and Information

                              Has anyone here had the endoscopic tacking of the stomach done on their Dane? I was told it was a fairly new proceedure, but worth it... however they want $2200 to do it. Has anyone had this done?

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                              • #30
                                RE: Bloat Checklist-References and Information

                                I would not recommend the pexy being done endoscopicaly. I don't think they can see well enough. My girl was done this way and suffered very severe complications. A part of the stomach flapped over the opening into the intestines, but they didn't see that until a month later when they opened her up to determine why she was still vomiting. They released the tack, but because of all the vomiting, holes were burned in her esphogas. She is now fed through a feeding tube inserted into her stomach. I am sure that others have had great success with this procedure, but I would never have it done this way again because of our experience.
                                Kathy VL

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