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  • Bloat Checklist-References and Information


    http://www.danesonline.com/resources...s-bloat-1.html

    Checklist

    20 Signs that your dog may be in trouble from bloat or torsion:

    (1) distended abdomen
    (2) rigid (hard) abdomen
    (3) painful when touched in the abdomen
    (4) vomiting foamy or liquid material
    (5) unproductive attempts at vomiting or retching
    (6) arched back
    (7) praying position (down in front, rear standing)
    (8) laying down on belly - crouched position
    (9) curling up in a ball
    (10) laying or sitting in an unusual location
    (11) seeking a hiding place
    (12) looking at their side
    (13) frequent swallowing (aerophagia)
    (14) hypersalivation (drooling heavily)
    (15) drinking excessively
    (16) lack of appetite
    (17) quiet, any abnormal behavior
    (18) lethargy, weakness
    (19) panting, breathing rapidly or heavily
    (20) red gums, or white gums (not normal pink color)

    You know your own dog the best and you know when things aren't quite right.

    If you notice any of these signs in your dog,call your vet or take him to an emergency clinic as soon as possible. Not all dogs show the classic signs of bloat or GDV, some may be very subtle or be at a pre-bloat stage.

    Keep a copy of this list, your vets phone number, an emergency clinic phone number, and you pet's medical history in a convenient place in case of an emergency. Bloat and GDV occur very quickly, and a dog can be in shock within minutes.
    sigpic
    In Memory of Sky, EZ and Honor

    Visit Poke's Facebook Page

    Member of the GDC of MD.
    Well behaved danes are not born. They are “made” by responsible and caring dane owners.

  • #2
    RE: Bloat Checklist-References and Information

    Thanks! This list will now grace my refrigerator. :e)

    Comment


    • #3
      RE: Bloat Checklist-References and Information

      Great list! Refridgerator is a good spot.

      Got a call from my BIL two states away one night. He was in a panic because he could not find an all night vet for his cat in the phone book. I was able to find him one online but it took a good 20 minutes.

      Minutes are critical with bloat. People should not count on finding the number while in a panic situation. Find one today or better yet right now.

      Comment


      • #4
        RE: Bloat Checklist-References and Information

        I would also like to add that Zeus had unproductive attempts at pooping while bloating.
        sigpic
        RIP my sweet Zeus Boy. I'll always love you. 08/28/01 - 08/23/11
        Levi...born June 29th, 2011
        Stella...Gotcha Day May 19th, 2013 (born February 26, 2012)
        Levi and Stella's Facebook page:
        https://www.facebook.com/LeviAndStella?ref=hl

        Comment


        • #5
          RE: Bloat Checklist-References and Information

          My two do about 5 of those things on a daily basis...should that be a concern? I know the basic signs of bloat, but I am so stressed out on a daily basis worrying about it...I know it's not uncommon in Danes, and I take every precaution I can, but sometimes I think I'm being paranoid

          Comment


          • #6
            RE: Bloat Checklist-References and Information

            Just want to add as something to do before bloat, or any other emergency occurs:

            Locate your nearest Emergency Vet Clinic. Call them to make sure they're 24hr. Write down directions on where they are located, and their phone number. Keep this info on you and easily accessible at home. And lastly, share this information with your family in case something happens while you are away from your dog so your family won't have to do the clinic search routine.

            Cindy

            sigpic

            Comment


            • #7
              RE: Bloat Checklist-References and Information

              >My two do about 5 of those things on a daily basis...should
              >that be a concern? I know the basic signs of bloat, but I am
              >so stressed out on a daily basis worrying about it...I know
              >it's not uncommon in Danes, and I take every precaution I can,
              >but sometimes I think I'm being paranoid

              Well, you know your dogs. Knowing your dogs and what is typical of them is key. If they do this on a regular basis, then it shouldn't cause a concern. Zeus has never done that. I didn't even know it was a sign of it until Friday night, while Zeus was in surgery. I came home and did some more reading on bloat.

              His signs were:

              1. Unproductive attempts to vomit
              2. Extreme thirst
              3. Unproductive attemps to poop
              4. Distended, hard abdomen
              5. Red gums
              6. Malaise
              sigpic
              RIP my sweet Zeus Boy. I'll always love you. 08/28/01 - 08/23/11
              Levi...born June 29th, 2011
              Stella...Gotcha Day May 19th, 2013 (born February 26, 2012)
              Levi and Stella's Facebook page:
              https://www.facebook.com/LeviAndStella?ref=hl

              Comment


              • #8
                RE: Bloat Checklist-References and Information

                That is so scary! Is Zeus OK now? I hope everything came out alright.

                Edited" Oops, never mind that question, I hadn't yet seen the posts below. Sorry. Thanks for sharing.

                Comment


                • #9
                  RE: Bloat Checklist-References and Information

                  hi

                  i want to add some othello did this weekend which was not included...

                  he showed most of the signs.. such as . vomiting.. praying position.. i gave him gas x.. he burped.. not farted..sorry about being graphic.. but it is important to know... after these attempts.. his stomach became less bloated... he was not able to fart bacuse of the twisting of his gut...i thought he was becoming better... my vet called and told me to bring him in... i thought he would be fine... little did i realize.. he has twisted at that point... whatever i could have was not enough.. surgery was needed...

                  i do hope this helps anybody out there.. just because you think he/she feels/looks better... you don't know what is going on inside of them... please..PLEASE take them to a vet asap... time is so important...

                  love and licks
                  sheryl

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                  • #10
                    RE: Bloat Checklist-References and Information

                    So did Jake, he was trying to vomit and defecate at the same time, with nothing coming out from either end.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      RE: Bloat Checklist-References and Information

                      Ive beed told about bloat before by my vet and by others, this is the first time ive seen a list like this, and i understand dogs may do some of those things in everyday life. That being said after seeing all of these symtoms im it made me pairinoid. So.. i have a few questions for those of you who were unlucky enough to have to go through it. One, when you noticed the symtoms i am asuming it was loud and clear that something was wrong.( dog wasnt walking around waging is tail) and the other is not really pertaining to the symtoms but comes out of curiosity, were any of your dogs agressive when you tried to help them, i remember as a child that our dog was agressive twords my parents when they tried to help her. THANKS

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        RE: Bloat Checklist-References and Information

                        It was obvious to me pretty quickly that Zeus was bloating. You can just tell when something is wrong...he was in great discomfort and showed numerous signs (unproductive attempts to vomit, hard, swollen abdomen, salivating profusely, bright pink gums...).

                        To answer your second question, no, he never became aggressive. Even at the emergency vets office, he was very tolerant of everyone around him.
                        sigpic
                        RIP my sweet Zeus Boy. I'll always love you. 08/28/01 - 08/23/11
                        Levi...born June 29th, 2011
                        Stella...Gotcha Day May 19th, 2013 (born February 26, 2012)
                        Levi and Stella's Facebook page:
                        https://www.facebook.com/LeviAndStella?ref=hl

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          RE: Bloat Checklist-References and Information

                          So is the main cause of bloat exercising directly before or after they have eaten? Is that correct? I free feed my three girls with no problems. And the Dane puppy is very playful and likes to run and jump around most of the day. I also take her to the park during the day and let her off the leash to run. So she pretty much romps about thoughout the entire day, and she eats whenever she feels like it. Now that I am thinking about it, I am assuming this could possibly increase her risk of bloat? (So far, no problems, but I've only had her for three months, and she's my first dane.) What do you guys think? Are there any other primary causes of bloat that can be avoided?

                          Thanks! :-)

                          Grace

                          --------------------------------------------------

                          Sadie - 7 yr. old Husky Mix
                          Siouxsie (pronounced "Suzie") - 6 year old Vizsla
                          Stori - 5 month old Great Dane puppy
                          Spooky - one annoyed 10 year old cat

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            THIS INFO SAVED MY DOG'S LIFE!!!!

                            Thank you for this information; it saved Lexi's life last Sunday.

                            I came home from church and my girl was her normal, happy-go-lucky self.

                            Within 20 minutes of my coming home, she threw up what looked to be stomach bile, then started to retch and drool excessively.

                            She laid down very gingerly, and was looking at her side, all the while gagging and bringing up massive amounts of ropy drool and saliva.

                            I couldn't see any abdominal bloating, but I knew it was bloat.

                            I called the emergency vet, and took her there. They diagnosed her within an hour of her first showing symptoms, and she was in surgery by 6:00 p.m. Sunday evening.

                            The vet called me after surgery to let me know that Lexi had survived it, and to thank me for bringing her in so soon. Apparently, her spleen got involved when her stomach twisted, and it was bleeding and on the point of bursting by the time she went into surgery. The vet said if I had been slower in responding to Lexi's illness, that her spleen would have burst, and we would have lost her.

                            Lexi's home now, and being treated like the precious treasure she is. She has staples from her breastbone down her abdomen, and looks pretty pitiful. She's on oral antibiotics twice a day for the next 7 days, and has to be kept quiet. She's also only allowed a cup of soft, moist food every 6-8 hours, but she's ravenous, which is a good sign.

                            The vet tacked her stomach, so I don't have to worry about her bloating ever again. I asked WHY she had bloated, when I've done everything humanly possible to prevent it the last 2 years. The vet told me that sometimes it just happens, no matter how careful you are.

                            I thank God I knew the signs for bloat from reading it here, as well as knowing my own dog so well to know right away that something just wasn't right with her the minute she got sick.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              RE: THIS INFO SAVED MY DOG'S LIFE!!!!

                              Great success story - and such fast action on your part - the info and YOU saved her life as well. So glad she's recovering nicely and doing fine. Best wishes to smooth sailing from here,

                              Moe
                              Reb's Mom

                              The great pleasure of a dog is that you may make a fool of yourself with him and not only will he not scold you, but he will make a fool of himself too. ~Samuel Butler, Notebooks, 1912

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